Saturday, 8 September 2018

Sister E. Salvator of the Nyasaland Nursing Service - 8th September 1918

Sister E. Salvator of The Nyasaland Nursing Service, died on 8th September 1918. Sister Salvator was buried in Mangochi Town Cemetery, Malawi, Africa - Grave Reference: 23.   According to Anne Samson of the Great War in Africa Association, Sister Salvator was a religious Sister of the Society of Mary (Marist Mission ) (Gazette 1917 - https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30305/supplement/9943/data.pdf)
The Montfort Marist Fathers had apparently arrived in Nyasaland in 1901.

With thanks to Anne Samson and photographer Derek Walker for their kind help.  If anyone knows anything about Sister E. Salvator, please get in touch.

I found a family called Salvator from Italy who lived in Glasgow.  The father, Engliano was a stone mason.  They had a daughter, Ernestin, born in France in 1886

Thursday, 6 September 2018

An exhibition commemorating the women of WW1, Rathbone Studio, Birkenhead, Wirral, UK - Heritage Week


A stunning collection of paintings by talented artist Rebecca Grinlay will be on display during Heritage Week 2018 at The Rathbone Studio in Argyle Street, Birkenhead, Wirral, UK. The exhibition is to commemorate the women of WW1.

The Rathbone Studio, 
28 Argyle Street • 
Birkenhead • Wirral • 
CH41 6AE   UK

07903 337 995 • info@rathbonestudio.com

Open Tuesday to Saturday: 2.00pm to 5.00pm
http://www.rathbonestudio.com/

Tuesday, 28 August 2018

Women in the Great War” by Stephen Wynn and Tanya Wynn (Pen & Sword, Barnsley, 2017) - Review

This is an extremely interesting, fast-paced and informative book.  Although I knew quite a lot of the information provided since I began researching for a series of commemorative exhibitions, I also found a good deal that was new to me.   The book begins with an overview of the situation of women – in particular those campaigning to be permitted to vote - during the years leading up to 1914.   Chapter Two is about Munitions Workers with details of dangers involved and the explosions that took place.   Brief mention is also made about the very popular, fund-raising football matches in which the women who worked in factories during WW1 took part.

Chapter Three goes into detail about the history and formation of the Voluntary Aid Detachments and I found this particularly interesting because there is a good deal of confusion these days with the use of the acronym VAD.  Included in that chapter are details of some of the famous women who were VADs .  Chapter Four is devoted to the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) which became the Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps.   Included here is a list of the women of the Corps who died or were killed during WW1.

In Chapter Five, you will find details of other women’s organisations - such as The Women’s Legion, The Territorial Force Nursing Service, The Women’s Hospital Corps, The Women’s Volunteer Reserve, The Women’s Auxiliary Force, The Women’s Land Army, Women Police Force Volunteers, The Women’s Forage Corps, The Women’s Forestry Corps, The Almeric Paget Military Massage Corps, The Women’s Royal Air Force, The Women’s Sick and Wounded Convoy Corps, The Women’s National Land Service Corps and Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service.  Also included in that chapter is the story of Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm who initially went to Belgium with Hector Munro’s Flying Ambulance Unit.

Chapter Six is entitled “Individual Women of the Great War” and has some very interesting stories about women who were secret agents during the conflict.  Chapter Seven lists some of the many women who died or were killed while serving in some capacity during WW1 and Chapter Eight is devoted to the war-time service of Queen Mary and her daughter, Princess Mary.  The book ends with a Conclusion, Acknowledgements and an Index and is beautifully illustrated throughout with photographs and copies of posters, etc.

I was particularly interested in the details of the deal the British Government brokered with the Women’s Social and Policical Union when war broke out (page 4) and a certain incredible fact about DORA that I did not know (page 5).   Information about the involvement of the daughter of Lloyd George was also interestiong (page 28), as I had not heard about her, 

For me the most fascinating story was about the Christmas 1914 gift to serving military personnel known as Princess Mary’s Tin.  My Old Contemptible Grandfather died when I was four years old. When I was growing up, Mother kept his Christmas tin in the kitchen drawer, where it contained pieces of string and sealing wax.  I used to look at the tin and marvel at the names embossed on the lid but it was not until I read this book that I found out about the background to the gift and saw photographs of the contents of the tin (pages 134 – 137).

A most enjoyable book which I would definitely recommend to anyone interested in the role of women during The First World War.

“Women in the Great War” by Stephen Wynn and Tanya Wynn was published by Pen & Sword, Barnsley in 2017.  For further details please see https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/ where you will find details of other fascinating war-related books published by Pen & Sword.

Lucy London, August 2018

Saturday, 18 August 2018

Remembering the women of WW1 who died on 14th August 1918

TERLINCTHUN BRITISH CEMETERY, WIMILLE, Pas de Calais, France

Nurse EDITH INGRAM.  With the 55th Gen. Hospital.  Edith was born in 1887. Her parents were Mr and Mrs S.A. Ingram of Littlehampton. Edith joined the Voluntary Aid Detachment and was posted to France. Edith died on 14 August 1918, at the age of 31. Sh was buried in Terlinchthun British Cemetery, Wimille, Pas de Calais, France. Grave Reference: II. C. 27.   Edith features in a special commemorative book donated to the group Wenches in Trenches The Roses of No Man’s Land “Women Casualties of the Great War in Military Cemeteries – Volume 1:  Belgium & France” where you will find reference to Edith on page 69.

LIVERPOOL (TOXTETH PARK) CEMETERY, Lancashire, United KingdomRemembering Staff

Nurse LILIAN THOMAS, No.  2/Res/T/91 of The Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Lilian Thomas was born in Garston, Liverpool and lived in Toxteth.    Lilian worked at The University War Hospital in Southampton, Hampshire, UK.  Lilian’s parents were William Thomas, born in Seacombe and Emma Thomas, nee Shimmin, born on the Isle of Man.  The family lived in "Carrock," High Bebington Rd., Lower Bebington, Cheshire. Lilian died on 14th August 1918 at the age of 27. She was buried in Toxteth Park Cemetery, Liverpool - Grave Reference: VIII. C.E. 666.
With thanks to Walter Volleamere for additional information about Staff Nurse Thomas.

PORTSMOUTH (HIGHLAND ROAD) CEMETERY, Hampshire, United Kingdom

Charlotte Sophia DUKE, No. G/3028,  was a cook with The Women's Royal Naval Service. Charlotte was born on 22nd July 1895 in Croydon, Surrey. Her parents were Tom and Martha Duke and her siblings were: Sarah, Thomas, Joseph, Elizabeth, Martha and Christine.  Charlotte joined on 17th January 1918 and was at HMS Victory. She worked at the Lion Hotel, Portsmouth (presumably commandeered for war accommodation) from 2nd July 1918.   She died on 14th August 1918 at the age of 23 and was buried in Highland Road Cemetery, Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK. Grave Reference: North Wall. E. 3. 17.

Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Elizabeth Coghill Bartholomew (1894 - 1975) - British VAD


With thanks to Sergio Sbalchiero for sending me this information about VAD Elizabeth Coghill Bartholomew, known as Betty (1894 - 1975), who served on the Italian Front in WW1. 

Elizabeth was born on 23rd May 1894 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Elizabeth's parents were Ian John George Bartholomew, who was cartographer to the King, and his wife, Janet Bartholomew. Elizabeth’s siblings were: 

John (Ian) Bartholomew, an officer in the Gordon Highlanders, who served in France and Flanders, George Hugh Freeland Bartholomew, a Captain with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who was killed in France in October 1917 at the age of 21 and buried in the Rocquigny - Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manancourt, France, Louis St Clair Bartholomew and Margaret (Maisie) Hamilton Bartholomew.

Nicknamed "Betty Bar", Elizabeth joined the 2nd Edinburgh Voluntary Aid Detachment in July 1916 – her address at that time was Gardon, Morton Hall Road, Edinburgh. She worked in Italy with the First British Red Cross Unit from July 1916 to October 1917, at the Hospital of Villa Trento in Dolegnano. Elizabeth was then posted to France, where she worked at No.1 Anglo Belge, Bonsecours, France from June 1918 until April 1919.

After the war, Elizabeth married Henry Pitney van Deusen from Princeton, USA, who went to study theology in Edinburgh. Elizabeth died in Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey, USA on 14th February 1975.

Photos of Betty in Italy and the Hospital Villa Trento, Dolegnano, Italy from Sergio Sbalchiero

Sunday, 12 August 2018

Book Review: "Hattie Big Sky" and "Hattie ever after" by Kirby Larson

My friend Margaret in America sent me a gift of a copy of "Hattie Big Sky" to help with my research into women in the First World War.  I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book, which is inspired by, and based on, the early life of Kirby Larson's Step Great-Grandmother.  Although the work is fiction, Kirby has woven some of Hattie's true story into the work. 

Kirby went to great lengths to research the background of the book, travelling to Montana and talking to relatives of the people who knew Hattie.   The descriptions of how hard life was in remote areas back then give us an insight into what life was like at that time.   There are also stories of how America coped with the war on the home front. We find out what life was like for the 'Doughboys' when Hattie writes to her old school chum, Charlie, who is a soldier with the American Expeditionary Force in France.

I contacted Kirby to tell her how very much I had enjoyed reading "Hattie Big Sky" and she very kindly sent me a copy of the sequel - "Hattie Ever After" - another 'couldn't put it down' book.  This time we follow Hattie to San Francisco, where she finally achieves a long-cherished dream.  The book gives some interesting insights into what life was like for women in the years following WW1 when they had entered the workforce in large numbers.  Many people expected life to return the way it was before 1914.

"Hattie Big Sky" by Kirby Larson, published by Yearling, New York, 2006 and
"Hattie Ever After" by Kirby Larson, published by Delacorte Press, New York, 2013.

For further information, please see http://www.hattiebigsky.com/
and http://www.kirbylarson.com/hattie-ever-after/



Friday, 3 August 2018

VIOLET ALICE LAMBTON. LONG, O B E.

Remembering VIOLET ALICE LAMBTON. LONG, O B E., Chief Controller of The Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps who was drowned at sea when the Hospital Ship HMHS "Warilda" sank on 3rd August 1918.

His Majesty's Australian Transport “Warilda” was built by William Beardmore and Company in Glasgow as the SS “Warilda” for the Adelaide Steamship Company.  She was designed for the East-West Australian coastal service, but following the start of the First World War, was converted into a troopship and later, in 1916, into a hospital ship.

On 3rd August 1918, HMHS “Warilda” was taking wounded soldiers from Le Havre, France to Southampton when she was torpedoed by the German submarine UC-49. The ship was marked clearly with the Red Cross. Germany justified this action by maintaining the ships were also carrying weapons – though in this case it would surely have been travelling in the wrong direction to transport arms.

The ship sank in about two hours, and of the 801 persons on board, 123 died. The wreck is in the English Channel.

Photographs from the collection held for the nation by the Imperial War Museum in London.  Name of photographer unknown.

HOLLYBROOK MEMORIAL, SOUTHAMPTON, Hampshire, United Kingdom
LONG, Chief Controller, VIOLET ALICE LAMBTON. O B E. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Drowned at sea (from HMHS "Warilda"), 3 August 1918. 

With many thanks to Debbie Cameron and Mark Bristow for the following information about Violet:

Violet Beatrix Alice Lambton Long nee Way, O.B.E. was born in Gosford, Northumberland on 30th April 1883, the daughter of Col. Wilfred FitzAlan Way and Henrietta Mary Way, nee Ross.  Violet’s sister, Florence Edith Victoria Leach, nee Way, who also served in the QMAAC, was born in Jersey in 1874.  Her other siblings were Ethel E.H Way, born 1877, Wilfred G.M Way, born 1878.
In 1881 her father (who was born at Long Ashton) was at Ashton Court in Somerset with his cousin Baronet John G. Smith (family known later as Smyth). Ashton Court by the way was used as an Officers Hospital during WW1.

At time of 1901 census she was residing at Portsmouth with her father, 55 year old retired Infantry Colonel Wilfred Way. She was born in Northumberland at time he was a Captain with 5th Fusiliers.
Violet married William Edward Long in 1901. Violet and William had two daughters, Felicity Annette Cynthia Long and Violet Long.

Major W.E.Long, O.B.E.(son of Colonel W. Long, C.M.G.) was a Captain in the Remount Service/4th Hussars, and they lived at Newton House, Hill Road, Clevedon.
(Clevedon Town Council took over from Clevedon Urban District Council for whom Colonel Long was Chairman from 1908 - 1923.)

According to the "Chiswick Times" Violet lived at 4, Abinger Road, Bedford Park with her husband and two daughters. The vicar of her local church, where her name is listed on the WW1 memorial, said that "Mrs Violet Long was a splendid speciman of womanhood." She helped with the training of a large number of candidates in the Parish Hall for the examination by the St John Ambulance Society.

The vicar also said " It is well for us to remember the heroic part women have played in this war, and the especial worthiness of Mrs. Long in particular, who lived among us."
"Violet Long was responsible for the cookery and domestic section of the Women's Legion. When the Women's Legion amalgamated with the WAACs Mrs. Long brought over 3,000 recruits."
"Mrs Long was a very handsome woman with a magnificent head of bright brown hair."

The newspaper report also explains that Major William Long, Violet's husband, was in Egypt at the time doing remount work.

The following account of the sinking is by Miss Charlotte Allen Trowell QMAAC the only survivor of two members of the Corps who were aboard HMHS “Warilda”:

"I was acting as orderly to Mrs. Long, Deputy Chief Controller of the QMAAC. There was no warning of impending disaster when I retired to my bunk at a quarter to twelve. Mrs Long came to my bunk just before retiring herself and inquired, "Are you comfy?" and gave me some chocolates.

When the torpedo struck the vessel I was thrown out of my bunk. I hurried on deck, and just as I got up there the stairway was blown up.

There was no panic. Those wounded boys although dying, were splendid. I was put into a boat filled with wounded, but as the vessel sank our boat was not level. A davit rope was cut, but the boat capsized and we were thrown into the water. I clung to a rope and a wounded American Officer and an Australian pulled me into another boat. The wounded soldiers who were in that boat insisted on wrapping their saturated blankets around me.

I shall never forget the end of Mrs. Long who had been so kind to me. She clung to the boat into which I had been dragged and I caught hold of her by the hair. She exclaimed "Oh save me. My feet are fastened. I have lost a foot." Her feet had become entangled in some rope.

Strenuous efforts succeeded in freeing her limbs and a Southampton sailor tried hard to get her into the boat, but she collapsed suddenly, fell back and was drowned.

We were about two hours in the boat before we were picked up. "


Wednesday, 25 July 2018

Book Review “The War Nurses” by Lizzie Page (Bookouture, an imprint of StoryFire Ltd., London, 2018)

"The War Nurses" is a fictional story based loosely on the activities of Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm, who nursed the wounded in Flanders during the First World War.

Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm were among the first women involved in the First World War that I researched for a commemorative exhibition about some of the amazing ‘Inspirational Women’ of WW1, so I was really pleased when Lizzie asked me to review her book about the ‘Angels of Pervyse’.  Apart from Pat Barker’s “Regeneration Trilogy”, “Warhorse” and “Birdsong”, I have not read a novel about WW1 for the past six years, as I have been reading factual accounts for research purposes.   This novel is therefore a welcome change for me. 

It is very difficult for people these days to imagine what life must have been like in 1914, when none of those things we all rely on existed: no Internet, social media, mobile phones, television, radio, air travel, holidays abroad, etc.  Ordinary folk did not have a telephone at home and newspapers and telegrammes were the main means of spreading news.  Many people never ventured outside their own village – the First World War changed all that.

“The War Nurses” is a work of fiction but Lizzie weaves an amazing and fascinating story, re-imagining what life must have been like for the two women. Lizzie puts herself in Mairi’s shoes, with inspiration from the true story of the four years the two women spent on the Western Front looking after the wounded.  Lizzie has obviously put her heart and soul into this book, to which she brings a very modern approach which, hopefully, will appeal to younger readers and spread the word at long last about all of the incredible women and their extensive involvement in The First World War.

A fascinating read.

Lucy London
www.inspirationalwomenofww1.blogspot.co.uk
July 2018

Jennie Jackson ("Young Kitchener") - a young girl from Lancashire who raised money for the fighting men during WW1

While I was researching a WW1 poet yesterday, I came across a reference to some poems about a young girl from Burnley, Lancashire, UK.  Jane, known as ‘Jennie’, Jackson, was also known as "Young Kitchener" for the work she did during the First World War collecting money to fund parcels for the fighting men.

Jennie Jackson was born on 27th December 1907.  Her parents were John and Kate Jackson and she had three brothers, all of whom served during WW1. William, the eldest, enlisted in the 3rd (Prince of Wales) Dragoon Guards on 31st October 1914.  Shortly afterwards, on 21st November 1914, Richard, the third son, volunteered to serve with the Shropshire Light Infantry.  John Samuel, the second son, joined the Royal Field Artillery on 29th October 1915.

If ever we needed proof that the First World War involved every man, woman and child in Britain, here it is.

The poems were written by Thomas Napoleon Smith, pen-name Tonosa. They were:  "Burnley's war flame (Jennie JACKSON), alias Y.K." and "Burnley's winning Jennie (Jennie Jackson)".

Thomas's son, Corporal Ewart G. Smith of the 2nd Infantry Brigade, Canadian Expeditionary Force, was killed in a trench on 27th September 1916.

My thanks to Andrew Mackay for sending me his photographs and information about Jennie. http://www.lancashire.gov.uk/ww1/blog/young-kitchener/ 

Find out more on Andrew's website: http://www.burnleyinthegreatwar.info/

The Photographs have been kindly supplied by Andrew Mackay from his private collection. 

Thank you Andrew.

An exhibition about poetry written by schoolchildren during the First World War is on display at The Wilfred Owen Story, Argyle Street, Birkenhead, Wirral, UK.

http://www.wilfredowenstory.com/



Friday, 13 July 2018

A wonderful tribute to Worker Mary 'May' Wylie of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps who died while serving in WW1

In an effort to persuade someone to visit the grave of Worker (equivalent to the male rank of Private) Mary 'May' Wylie of the QMAAC, who died on 9th July 1918 and was buried in Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool, UK, I wrote a letter to the "Liverpool Echo" who were kind enough to print the letter.


Here is what happened next: The Liverpool Scottish Association sent a message to my friend Sue Robinson of the group Wenches in Trenches The Roses of No Man's Land, saying: The Association was alerted by a recent letter to the 'Liverpool Echo' that today, 9th July 2018, was going to be the Centenary of the death in Oswestry of Worker Mary 'May' Wylie of Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps where she was serving on attachment to 3/10th (Scottish) Bn, Kings (Liverpool) Regiment.


She is buried in Anfield Cemetery. Consequently I conducted a short memorial service at the graveside and Kenny Whittaker played a lament. In July 1918 the Bootle Times noted that ".... May Wylie died for her country as surely as the gallant soldiers who fall in battle". A full report will appear in this Winter's newsletter. From the Liverpool Scottish Association via Sue Robinson.


My grateful thanks to "The Liverpool Echo", the Liverpool Scottish Association and Sue Robinson. Together "We will remember them" ALL.

Tuesday, 10 July 2018

Mrs Hilda Wynne (1884 - 1923) - British

Newspapers at the time of WW1 report that Hilda was ‘… probably the most decorated British woman of the First World War’.

Hilda was born in 1884 but I have been unable to find out more about her early life. According to the Peerage website, Hilda’s father was James Clifton Brown born in 1841 and a Colonel in the British Army. He was from Yorkshire and served as a Justice of the Peace (JP) in Essex, UK.  Hilda's mother was Amelia Wroe, who was apparently American. The Clifton Browns had ten children – Elsie, Howard, Edward, Louisa, Francis (who became a Vice Admiral), Mildred, Leonard, Douglas (who became a Colonel), Isla and Cedric who was born in 1887.

I can’t seem to find a Hilda and the marriages the four Clifton Brown girls made were not to anyone called Wynne. I found a Reginald Wynne who married a Hilda Brown in 1902, St. George’s Hannover Square, London. He died in Paris in 1913 and was a Colonel in the British Army who fought in the Boer War, which would tally with Hilda being a widow in 1917 when she went to visit America to raise funds to take an ambulance unit to Russia.

I read in one newspaper report about Hilda that her husband had been ‘a general’. According to the Red Cross website, a meeting was held at the Royal Automobile Club in London in September 1914, asking members to lend their vehicles for service as ambulances. Hilda and a man called Ivor Bevan (about whom I can find nothing!) formed the Bevan-Wynne Ambulance Unit and Hilda drove several of the vehicles to Belgium herself. She was based in Dixmunde, where she met up with Dr. Hector Monro and Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm, who also took a mobile ambulance unit to Belgium and France in 1914.

There is a mention of Hilda in Sarah Macnaughtan’s book about her war on two continents. And a photograph of Hilda was featured on the front cover of “The Sketch” on 2nd September 1915, with this report:

"Hilda Wynne in the trenches in the Western Front After service in Belgium, France and Italy, in 1917 Hilda went to America and raised funds for the Anglo Russian Bevan Ambulance Cars Unit."

At that time Hilda was living in West Chapel Street in Mayfair, London. She served in Russia until 1919 and was awarded the Kuaatan Order of St. George for her work with Russian Guards on the Kovel Front.

Hilda died penniless in Paris on 28th January 1923, having spent all her money on looking after the wounded.

Sources: http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/albert-bushnell-hart/harpers-pictorial-library-of-the-world-war--volume-7-tra/page-11-harpers-pictorial-library-of-the-world-war--volume7-tra.shtml Award from Russia http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/22343113/2539987 and photograph from "The Sketch" newspaper of 2nd September 1915.

I am very grateful indeed to Sergio Sbalchiero for additional information about Hilda' and her war-time service:

"At the beginning of the war Hilda Wynne enlisted in the Hector Munro's Ambulance Corps operating on the Flanders front. There she met another volunteer, the Scottish banker Ivor Bevan. Together, they founded the Wynne Bevan Ambulance Corps. They operated on the Russian front from 1915 to 1917 in Galicia, Persia and Caucaso. In october 1917 they went to Italy and settled in Preganziol, a little town near Treviso, transporting the wounded on the Piave front. In june 1918, during the last Austrian offensive, they transported 840 Italian wounded. After the battle Hilda received a silver medal for valour and a cross of war. In Flanders she had been decorated with the Order of Leopoldo II and the Croix de Guerre. In Russia she received twice medals of the Order of St. George from the Tsar. She received also a medal of the Red Cross. An Italian officer said that she was 'a worthy follower of Florence Nightingale'."

My thanks also to Lynne Sidaway who tells me that Hilda's son was still alive aged 91 in 1995, living in Tennessee, America.

Friday, 6 July 2018

Some of the women who died or were killed during the First World War in July 1918

 July 1918

1st

MANCHESTER (GORTON) CEMETERY, Lancashire, UK

SMITH, Staff Nurse, F. E. SMITH, No. 2/ResS/1235. Staff Nurse Smith worked at the Military Hospital in Aylesbury, UK during WW1. She served with the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service and died on 1st July 1918.  Staff Nurse Smith was buried in Gorton Cemetery, Manchester, Grave Reference: P. C.E. 140.

3rd

MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA, Greece
MacDOWELL, Chauffeuse, MATILDA with theScottish Women's Hospital. Matilda died on 3rd July 1918 and was buried in Mikra British Cemetery, Kalamaria, Greece, Grave Reference: 1553.


BASRA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq   
KEMP, Staff Nurse, C. M. F. Kemp of the 40th British General Hospital. Staff Nurse Kemp was a member of the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. She died on 4th July 1918 and was buried in Basra War Cemetery in Mesopotamia (now in Iraq) - Grave Reference: III. T. 2.

6th
EDINBURGH (ROSEBANK) CEMETERY, Edinburgh, UK
ELDER, Telephonist, ELIZABETH GRANT ELDER, No. G/2605 with the Women's Royal Naval Service. Elizabeth died on 6th July 1918 and was buried in Rosebank Cemetery, Edinburgh, UK - Grave Reference: K. 207.

7th
CANTERBURY CEMETERY, KENT, Kent, UK
MOSS, Driver, R M. MOSS, of the Women's Legion, attached to the Army Service Corps. Driver Moss died on 7th July 1918 and was buried in Canterbury Cemetery, Kent, UK - Grave Reference: R. 351.

LAMBETH CEMETERY, London, UK
EVANS, Member, NELLIE, 12410 of the Women's Royal Air Force. Nellie died of sickness on 7th  July 1918 at the age of 23.  Nellie was married to A. W. Evans, of Courtney Road., Drayton Park, Holloway, London. Grave Reference: Screen Wall. H.3. 859.

9th
LIVERPOOL (ANFIELD) CEMETERY, Lancashire, UK

Worker (which is equivalent to the male rank of Private) May (Mary) Wylie, No. 6306 of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps, was attached to the 10th Reserve Battalion of The King's (Liverpool Scottish Regiment). May was born in 1898 in Bootle. Her parents were Hugh Wylie and his wife Emily Mary Wylie, nee Hodgson of Stanley Rd., Bootle.  May had the following siblings:  Harold, Margaret, Rose and Allan.    May died on 9th July 1918 at at Oswestry Military Hospital at the age of 20.  May’s body was returned home for her funeral and she was buried with full military honours in Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool - Grave Reference: I. U. 786.  May is also remembered on Bootle Civic Memorials in Linacre Council School and Liverpool (Anfield) Cemetery



10th
FRENSHAM (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD, Surrey, UK
STEWART, Staff Nurse, WILMA BRIDGES of the Territorial Force Nursing Service. Wilma died of phthisis on 10th July 1918. Her parents were Charles W. and Sarah Bridges Stewart, of Pembroke Crescent, Hove, Sussex. Grave Reference: On West boundary.

12th
BUXTON CEMETERY, Derbyshire, UK
ROSS, Nursing Sister, ADA JANET of the 1st Gen. Hosp., Canadian Army Medical Corps. Ada died on 12th  July 1918, at the age of 50. Grave Reference: 2479.

13th

ALVIE PARISH CHURCHYARD, Inverness-shire, UK

GRANT, Worker, JESSIE, 21527. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Died of pneumonia, 13 July 1918. Age 25. Daughter of George and Bella Grant, of Rest Cottage, Kincraig. Grave Reference: In South-East corner.


15th
FOREST TOWN (ST. ALBAN) CHURCHYARD, Nottinghamshire, UK

YOUNG, Nurse, ADA ELIZABETH. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 15 July 1918. Age 33.
Daughter of the late Serjt. Maj. Young (5th Dragoon Guards) and Mrs. Young, of Dublin. 

16th
WOOLWICH CEMETERY, London, UK
DAW, Worker, WINIFRED, 7319. M.T. Depot (Sydenham), Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 16 July 1918. Grave Reference: 11. 278

17th
LEATHERHEAD (SS. MARY AND NICHOLAS) CHURCHYARD, Surrey, UK
WELLER, Worker, ADA ELIZABETH, 39645. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 17 July 1918. Grave Reference: In East part.

21st
STE. MARIE CEMETERY, LE HAVRE, Seine-Maritime, France
ASPDEN, Worker, DOROTHY, 30438. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 21 July 1918. Grave Reference: Div. 62. III. N. 6.

22nd

BROOKWOOD CEMETERY, Surrey, UK
HILLS, Sister, MAUDE ELLEN. Territorial Force Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 22 July 1918. Age 43. Daughter of Edwin and Sarah Broadhurst Hills, of Cranbrook, Kent. Served in France. Grave Reference: H. 181321.

23rd

MORTON (THORNHILL) CEMETERY, Dumfriesshire, UK
HASTINGS, Sister, H M. Territorial Force Nursing Service. 23 July 1918. Grave Reference: G2. 12.

30th
TERLINCTHUN BRITISH CEMETERY, WIMILLE, Pas de Calais, France
YOUNG, Nurse, MARGARET CAMERON. 2nd Gen. Hosp., Voluntary Aid Detachment. Died of disease, 30 July 1918. Age 25. Daughter of Amelia and the late Thomas Young, of 37, Newington Avenue, Belfast. Grave Reference: I. F. 44.  See photo from Callan Chevin’s Fb page.


SWANMORE (ST. BARNABAS) CHURCHYARD, Hampshire, UK
HORNER, Worker, VIOLET MAY, 45051. Hostel (Bristol), Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 30 July 1918. Grave Reference: North-East of church.

Wednesday, 4 July 2018

Nursing Sister Mary Rodwell, QAIMNS

Sarah Reay, author of the fantastic book “The Half-Shilling Curate, A personal account of war & faith 1914-1918”, about her grandfather, Army Chaplain The Reverend Herbert Cowl, has given me permission to share this beautiful photograph of Sister Mary Rodwell with you.  The photograph from the author's own collection, is to be found on page 175 of the book.

Nursing Sister Mary Rodwell was the nurse attending Herbert when he was allowed to return to Britain for treatment after being seriously wounded  by a shell fragment.  They were aboard British Hospital Ship "Anglia", which hit a mine and sank while returning to Britain with wounded soldiers from the Western Front on 17th November 1915.

Mary Rodwell was born in Brockdish, Norfolk, UK (near Diss) on 7th June 1874. Her parents were John and Emma Rodwell, she later lived in the village of Oakley on the Norfolk/Suffolk border.

Mary trained as a nurse at Hendon Infirmary in North West London from 1901 to 1904.  She went on to work at the Samaritan Free Hospital, Marylebone Road, London, after which she worked as a private nurse. Mary was a member of the Crystal Palace and Anerley Women's Freedom League (WFL).

When war broke out, Mary felt it was her duty to volunteer for foreign service. From February to May 1915, she served on hospital trains, before being posted to the Hospital Ship "Anglia".  Mary was the only nurse on the ship who died when "Anglia" hit a mine and sank on 17th November 1915.

Sarah explains:

"Mary was amongst the nursing staff on board who attended to King George V on his return from France in October 1915, when he had been injured in a riding accident" while visiting the troops on the Western Front." (p.175).

Mary has no grave but is commemorated on the Hollybrook Memorial in Southampton, UK, on the QAIMNS memorial in York Minster, the memorial board in St. Paul's Anerly, near Penge, at Ditchingham Parish Church, Norfolk, at All Saints Church, Plumpton Green, near Lewes, Sussex, and on a plaque honouring 500 nurses who lost their lives in WW1 in Edinburgh Central Library.  On 2nd July 1920 a memorial bronze plaque was unveiled at Colindale hospital.

Here is the link to the book’s website: www.halfshillingcurate.com

Sources:  http://cohse-union.blogspot.com/2009/11/mary-rodwell-suffragette-and-ww1.html
and Sarah Reay, “The Half-Shilling Curate, A personal account of war & faith 1914-1918” (Helion & Co. Ltd., Solihull, West Midlanbds, UK, 2018)

The photograph, from Sarah Reay's private collection, is reproduced in "The Half Shilling Curate" on page 175. 

Remembering Staff Nurse, C. M. F. Kemp, QAIMNS

Remembering Staff Nurse, C. M. F. Kemp of the 40th British General Hospital in Mesopotamia during WW1. Staff Nurse Kemp was a member of the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. She died on 4th July 1918 and was buried in Basra War Cemetery in Mesopotamia (now in Iraq) - Grave Reference: III. T. 2.

Sunday, 1 July 2018

Remembering Staff Nurse F.E. Smith of the QAIMNS

Staff Nurse, F. E. SMITH, No. 2/ResS/1235. Staff Nurse Smith worked at the Military Hospital in Aylesbury, UK during WW1. She served with the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service and died on 1st July 1918.  Staff Nurse Smith was buried in Gorton Cemetery, Manchester, Grave Reference: P. C.E. 140.

Book Review by Historian Debbie Cameron: “British Widows of the First World War: The Forgotten Legion” by Andrea Hetherington

Debbie Cameron has written a review of the book “British Widows of the First World War:  The Forgotten Legion” by Andrea Hetherington, published by Pen & Sword Military, Barnsley, Yorkshire, UK, 2018 - ISBN: 9781473886766

“This book is packed with info about various committees, social history and personal stories to tempt a researcher. The first one I followed up was tragic. Sybil Griffin, widowed aged 18, shot herself 6/11/17. Her mother found her, her last words being “I have done for myself. I am going to Cecil” Her suicide note said her World was empty. But ended “… cheer up, your loving daughter”. I’ve found her husband’s RFC record card and researched him. He died in an aircraft accident in October 1917 aged just 23. Capt Griffiths died in a flying accident in Kenley UK. He initially survived but died of wounds. The aircraft is noted as being a ‘right (sic) off’. They were married for less than a year by special licence as she was just 17. Tragic.”

Historian Debbie Cameron runs an excellent Facebook Page called 'Remembering Women on the Home Front WW1' which you can find via this link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1468972083412699/  Debbie also contributes a great deal of material to the Imperial War Museum's Lives of the First World War Digital Memory Project: https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/

For further details about fantastic Pen and Sword military history books, please see their website https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/




Saturday, 23 June 2018

Staff Nurse Ruby Dickinson, Australian Army Nursing Service, died on 23rd June 1918

Remembering Staff Nurse, RUBY DICKINSON of the Australian Army Nursing Service. Ruby, who was born in Forbes, New South Wales, Australia, died on 23rd June 1918 at the age of 32. Daughter of William and Julia Dickinson, of "Arizona," Almora St., Mosman, Queensland.   Ruby was buried in the Churchyard of St. Mary’s Church, Harefield, Middlesex, UK - Grave Reference: Aust. 57.

Tuesday, 12 June 2018

Book Review: “Sister Poppy at the Front” by Brenda Gostling and Mik Richardson (Brenda Gostling, Norwich, 2018)

To my mind, this is a very important book.  Inspired by Poppy the GoGo Hare, a commemorative sculpture in Norfolk, and by the letters of the veteran war nurse Kate Luard, “Sister Poppy at the Front” tells the story of a member of Britain’s Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Nursing Service who served in France during the First World War. With the title character being depicted as a hare, the book is primarily aimed at small children. However,  adults will also enjoy reading the nurse’s story, which is complemented by some really beautiful drawings - reminiscent of the “Little Grey Rabbit” series.

I love the simplicity of the story told about the nurse, her duties in France, the conditions in which she worked and how she felt.   Finding her brother is the sort of coincidence that did happen. Brenda includes brief details of a Base Hospital, a Casualty Clearing Station and a Hospital Train. The illustrations really help to set the scene.   I particularly liked the illustration of Poppy’s QAIMNS tippet hanging in the cupboard on the first page and are they badgers who are stretcher bearers?

Reading the book took me back to my own primary school days when our headmistress often read us stories about a resourceful rabbit, and to my earliest introduction to the history of the First World War.  I vividly remember, as a very young child, looking at Grandfather’s black and white framed print of Fortunino Matania’s “Goodbye Old Man” and wondering what happened to the horse.  To my mind, it is vital to educate young children about our history and to ensure individual stories are recorded.  It is also good to find a book that describes the women of WW1 who contributed so much but who have been overlooked for so long.  My family always commemorated the First World War but it was not until I began researching in 2012 for a series of commemorative exhibitions about the conflict, that I realised the full involvement of women.

A share of any profits from the sale of “Sister Poppy at the Front” will go to the East Anglian charity Break, which runs children’s homes and also provides breaks for children and young people with disabilities and their families.

Some time ago, I heard of an initiative in Australia whereby people sponsor small teddy bears dressed in WW1 military uniforms, which are sent to primary schools to help educate children about Australia’s involvement in the conflict. Brenda tells me that a Norwich firm of Independent Financial Advisers – Almary Green - who were the sponsors of the Poppy GoGoHare sculpture - have kindly purchased a copy of the book for every primary school in the county of Norfolk – a total of 355 books.  Definitely an initiative to copy.

“Sister Poppy at the Front” £6.99, written and published by Brenda Gostling with illustrations by Mik Richardson.  Further details from http://www.brendagostling.co.uk/

Note:  The QARANC (as the QAIMNS has become) explain: “Brenda and Mik have amalgamated the uniforms of the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service and the Voluntary Aid Detachment to form the uniform as worn by Sister Poppy who nurses on a ward at No. 33 Casualty Clearing Station.”
http://www.qaranc.co.uk/Sister-Poppy-at-the-Front-GoGoHare.php

Photos: Brenda and Mik with the book and a cuddly hare in a nurse's uniform made by Mik's wife to accompany Brenda and  Mik on promotional visits.

Lucy London, 12th June 2018

Monday, 4 June 2018

Eleanor Eileen Black, VAD and Dorothea Kathleen Mary Bolus, South African VAD, who drowned on 4th June 1918

4th June 1918

Remembering Volunteer ELEANOR EILEEN. BLACK, a volunteer with the Voluntary Aid Detachment who drowned at sea from Royal Mail Ship RMS “Kenilworth Castle” on 4th June 1918. Eleanor was daughter of Randlord Black, of Queen's Road, Parktown, Johannesburg. Eleanor is remembered in York Minster, York, UK on the Panel commemorating the South Africa Army Nursing Service and on Hollybrook Memorial in Southampton, Hampshire, UK. 

Remembering Volunteer DOROTHEA KATHLEEN MARY BOLUS of the South African Voluntary Aid Detachment, a passenger on the RMS “Kenilworth Castle”, who drowned on 4th  June 1918. Dorothea was daughter of Mrs. Louise Bolus, of "Maisonnette," Kenilworth, Cape Town, South Africa. Dorothea was buried in Plymouth’s Efford Cemetery, in Devonshire, UK - Grave Reference: Church. C. 4785.

The Royal Mail Ship “Kenilworth Castle” was one of the first mail ships commissioned for the Union-Castle Shipping Line.  Built at Harland and Wolfe, Belfast in 1903, she was launched in 1904 and requisitioned as a troop carrier during the First World War. The ship was in a convoy sailing to Britain. It was dark and they had to sail without lights to avoid detection by German submarines.  35 miles off Portsmouth, two of the Royal Navy escort ships were in collision - HMS “Rival” and HMS “Kent”.  Depth chargers from “Rival” exploded under the “Kenilworth Castle”, which was badly damaged. The order was given to abandon ship.  Some of the life boats were lowered but became swamped and 15 people were drowned, among them Eleanor Black and Dorothea Bolus.    The RMS “Kenilworth Castle” eventually reached Portsmouth, where the remainder of her passengers were put ashore.  The ship was repaired, went to sea again after the war and was broken up in 1936.

Here is an extract from a letter from Nurse Bracken, one of the nurses who survived in which she described the incident:   “I'm sending you one of our newspaper accounts of the affair because it describes what happened to the lifeboat in which Black, Bolus, a Wynberg girl called Zondendyk, and myself were.   When the boat capsized I managed to hang on to the side and hung and hung until the boat righted itself but it was the most ghastly few minutes I ever lived through. I remember a big dark wave washing right over me and something - an oar, I think, pressed against my throat until I thought I should choke and something else crushed my eye against the boat's edge and I saw stars and felt my eyeball must burst. My corsets were torn right off me and my legs were bruised and bleeding. Then the boat righted itself and I found myself inside. There were just two of us left, the other a fellow passenger named Dawson and his pyjamas were simply tom to rags! Our boat was quite full of water and we had lost our oars and rudder.

We didn't see or hear anything of the others then and were drifting right away until the Kenilworth turned and her wash brought us rushing back. I really thought that was the very end but we did a surprising turn and instead of crashing into her we rushed along her side and crossed her stern so close that Mr Dawson was struck in the mouth and his teeth knocked out. Then we got out on the other side and that was the last we saw of the Kenilworth. It was horribly dark and we could hear the dreadful calls for help from men and women in the water but could not get near to them. Two women drifted right up to the boat and these were saved. One was the young wife of a Colonel of Marines - the other Nurse Zondendyk. I found a bucket and a scoop tied to the boat and these were used to bale out the water. Mr Dawson and I baled and baled until we were too tired to do any more but the boat felt almost respectable again so we all sat huddled together shivering and taking turns at being sea sick!” 

Read more from Nurse ‘s letter here:  http://samilitaryhistory.org/vol054kc.html

Original Source:  Commonwealth War Graves Commission List of Female Casualties of the First World War

Additional information kindly supplied by Derek Walker : http://www.southafricawargraves.org/search/details.php?id=1862

Sunday, 3 June 2018

Alice Hilda Lancaster, Special Military Probationer Nurse, TFNS - died 3rd June 1918

Remembering Nurse ALICE HILDA LANCASTER, a Special Military Probationer with the Territorial Force Nursing Service, who served in France during WW1.  Alice drowned whilst bathing on 3rd  June 1918 at the age  of 35. Alice was the youngest of five children born to Thomas Lancaster and his wife Alice Halliley Lancaster (nee Milner) of The Cliffe, Monk Bretton, Barnsley, Yorkshire.  She was buried in Wimereux Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France - Grave Reference: IV. A. 2. 

Alice is also remembered on a Memorial tablet in St Paul's Church Monk Bretton, in the Memorial book in St Paul's Church, Monk Bretton, on the War Memorial, Cross Street, Monk Bretton and on her mother's gravestone in Monk Bretton Cemetery

Photo of Alice’s grave from http://barnsleysoldiersww1.blogspot.com/2013/12/alice-hilda-lancaster-1883-1918.html

Original Source:  Commonwealth War Graves Commission List of Female Casualties of the First World War

Thursday, 31 May 2018

Some of the women of WW1 who died or were killed during May 1918

May 1918

1st May

BLETCHLEY CEMETERY, Buckinghamshire, UK

SAUNDERS, Worker, (Assistant Cook), LILIAN. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 1 May 1918. Age 25. Daughter of Mr and Mrs J Saunders, of Fenny Stratford. Grave Reference: Spec. Memorial.

5th May

WARNOCK, Nurse, ELIZABETH McMATH (DAISY). 10th (Glasgow) Detachment attd. 8th General Hospital, Voluntary Aid Detachment. Died of septicaemia, 5th May 1918. Age 31. Daughter of William and Mary Malcolm Elizabeth Muir Warnock, of 19, Westminster Terrace, Glasgow, late of Holytown, Lanarkshire. Buried St. Sever Cemetery, France, Grave Reference: Officers, B. 4. 23.

7th May

STREATHAM CEMETERY, London, United Kingdom

LATHAM, Forewoman, LOUISA FRANCES, 37124. Depot, Tank Corps (Wareham), Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Died of sickness, 7 May 1918. Age 39. Daughter of George and Catherine Latham, of

10th May

BASRA MEMORIAL, Iraq

HOBBES, Sister, NARRELLE. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Buried at sea, 10 May 1918. Age 37. Daughter of the late J.F. and Margaret Hobbes of New South Wales, Australia. Grave Reference: Panel 43.

12th May

BIRMINGHAM (LODGE HILL) CEMETERY, Warwickshire, UK

Staff Nurse, BEATRICE GEORGINA FREDERICA FORBES of the Territorial Force Nursing Service, who died on 12th May 1918. Beatrice was buried in Birmingham Lodge Hill Cemetery in Warwickshire, UK - Grave Reference: Screen Wall. B10. 2. 225.

16th May

MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA, Greece

Staff Nurse, MARGARET ELLISON DUCKERS of the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service, who died on 16th May 1918 at the age of 25. Margaret’s parents were James Samuel and Jane Duckers, of "Edencroft," Wetheral, Carlisle. She was buried in Mikra British Cemetery, in Kalamaria, Greece - Grave Reference: 254.

17th May

EDINBURGH (WARRISTON) CEMETERY, Edinburgh, UK

Remembering Assistant Administrator (equivalent to the male rank of Officer) MARJORIE TRAILL MARTIN, Service No. O/1144,  of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps, who died on 17th May 1918 at the age of 26.  Marjorie’s parents were the Rev. Alexander Martin, D.D. (Professor of Theology and Principal of New College, Edinburgh), and Jane Thorburn Martin. Marjorie was buried in Warriston Cemetery, Edinburgh - Grave Reference: K. 150.

19th May

ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

MACDONALD, Nursing Sister, KATHERINE MAUDE MARY MACDONALD of the 1st Canadian Gen.eral Hospital.  Katherine was with the Canadian Army Nursing Service. She was killed in action on 19th  May 1918 at the age of 31. Her parents were Mary Maud and Angus Macdonald, of Brantford, Ontario, Canada.  Katherine was buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, where you will find 19 other women who died in WW1.  Katherine’s Grave Reference for anyone visiting Etaples Military Cemetery is XXVIII. L. 8.

20th May 1918

ST. ARILDA'S CHURCHYARD, Oldbury, Gloucestershire, UK

Phoebe Elizabeth MEADOWS, a VAD with the Territorial Force Nursing Service.  Born 1889 died 20th May 1918. Phoebe’s parents were Charles and Phoebe Elizabeth Meadows. She was buried in St Arilda's Churchyard, Oldbury, Gloucestershire. Grave reference:B14.

21st May

ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

Nursing Sister, GLADYS MAUDE MARY WAKE of the 1st Canadian General Hospital. Gladys was with the Canadian Army Nursing Service. She died of wounds received during an airraid by enemy aircraft on 21st May 1918 at the age of 34.  Gladys’s parents were Gervas Fountayne Wake and Amy Rosamond Wake, of Compton Hill, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK. Gladys was born in Esqlaimault, British Columbia, Canada.  She was buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France , where you will find 19 other women who died or were killed during the First World War.  The Grave Reference for Gladys Maude Mary Wake is  XXVIII. L. 5.

23rd May

TRURO CEMETERY, NOVA SCOTIA, Nova Scotia, Canada
Remembering Nursing Sister, JESSIE  A. JARVIS of the Canadian Army Medical Corps. Jessie died of pneumonia on 23rd May 1918 at the age of 29.  Her parents were George M Jarvis and Frances M. Jarvis, of 176, Bolsford St., Moncton, New Brunswick.  Jessie was buried in Truro Cemetery, Nova Scotia, Canada.   Grave Reference: L. 50. Div. C. Third grave from North end.   I wonder if her grave receives any visitors?

24th May

RAWALPINDI WAR CEMETERY, Pakistan

Remembering Nurse RUTH MARY NODDER of the Territorial Force Nursing Service. Ruth died of sickness on 24th May 1918, at the age of 33.  Her parents were the Rev. J. B. Nodder and Mrs. Nodder, of Ashover Rectory, Chesterfield, Derbyshire.    Ruth was buried in Rawalpindi War Cemetery, which is in Pakistan. Grave Reference: 3. A. 6.  I wonder if her grave receives any visitors?

26th May

ASH CEMETERY, Surrey, United Kingdom

Remembering Mechanic Driver, Florence EMBLETON of the Women's Legion, who died on 26th May 1918.  Florence was born in Yorkshire in 1888. Her parents were John Embleton, a Captain in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps,and his wife, Sarah Embleton.  Florence had a brother Charles, b. 1891 in Egypt where his father was based at the time, and John, born in 1896.  Charles also joined the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, served in France during WW1 and died on 20th July 1916.  Florence and her family lived in York in 1901 and in Ash, Surrey, at the time of her death.  During WW1 Florence initially served as a clerk and then nursed in Aldershot Hospital.  Florence joined the Women’s League in 1917 and was a Motor Driver with No. 52 Motor Transport Corps, Army Service Corps, attached to the Army School of Sanitation.   She was buried with full military honours in Ash Cemetery, Ash, Surrey, UK, Grave Reference: F. 15-1.   Source:  CWGC List of Female Casualties of the First World War and http://www.ashmuseum.org.uk/embleton.htm


28th May

ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

Remembering Nursing Sister Margaret LOWE of the 1st Canadian Gen. Hosp., Canadian Army Nursing Service. Margaret was badly injured a German air raid on Etaples and died on 28th May 1918 at the age of 32.  Her father was Thomas Lowe, of Binscarth, Manitoba, Canada.  Margaret was buried with full military honours in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. Grave Reference: XXVIII. M. 9.

29th – 30th May 1918

The night of 29th - 30th May 1918 was particularly bad, as there were several German bombing raids on non-military targets such as hospitals.  In spite of the hospitals being clearly marked with Red Crosses and situated some way away from the Front, they were still bombed by enemy aircraft. The diary of No.3 Canadian Stationary Hospital records:  “The night was clear and bright. There should have been no difficulty in the airmen recognising it as a hospital.  The hospital is well marked with red crosses, which airmen say are quite visible from the air.  There is no doubt that the occupants of the aeroplane knew it was a hospital, for when the came back and dropped bombs a second time, the flames clearly illuminated the red crosses on the buildings.”
The women nurses, members of the QMAAC and volunteers killed during bombing raids on the night of 29th – 30th May 1918 were buried in the following cemeteries in France:

ABBEVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France

Worker (equivalent to the rank of Private) MARY McLACHLAN BLAIKLEY, 31503. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Mary was killed on 30th May 1918. She was a niece of Robert Blalkley, of Brown's Land, Cartcosh, nr. Glasgow. Grave Reference: IV. C. 4.

Worker BEATRICE V. CAMPBELL, 31673, of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps.  Beatrice was killed on 30th May 1918. Age 20. Daughter of the late John J. and Annie Morgan Campbell, of Cupar, Fife. Grave Reference: IV. C. 6.

Worker MARGARET SELINA CASWELL, 15703 of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps.  Margaret was killed on 30th May 1918 at the age of 22.  Her parents were Fredrick and Mary Jane Caswell, of Green Cross Farm, Churt, Farnham, Surrey. Grave Reference: IV. C. 1.

Worker CATHERINE CONNOR 34767 of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Catherine was killed on 30th May 1918. Grave Reference: IV. C. 9.
Worker JEANIE GRANT, 31918 of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Killed by a bomb from an enemy aeroplane, 30 May 1918. Age 22. Daughter of Mrs. J. Grant, of "Burnfoot," Greengairs, Airdrie, Lanarkshire. Grave Reference: IV. C. 7.

Worker, ANNIE ELIZABETH MOORES, 15695. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Killed in aerial attack on Abbeville, 30th May 1918 at the age of 27. Annie’s parents were Alfred and Mary Moores, of Charlton Lane, Ludwell, Salisbury, Wiltshire, UK. Grave Reference: IV. C. 3.

Worker, ETHEL FRANCIS MARY PARKER, 9048. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Killed by a bomb at Abbeville, 30 May 1918. Age 21. Daughter of William George Parker, of 6, East St., Sturry Rd., Canterbury. Grave Reference: IV. C. 2.

Worker, ALICE THOMASSON, 35588. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 30 May 1918. Grave Reference: IV. C. 8.

WATSON, Worker, JEANIE H. L., 34864. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 30 May 1918. Age 25. Daughter of Mrs. J. Oliphant, of 21, Park St., Cambuslang, Glasgow. Grave Reference: IV. C. 5.

BAGNEUX BRITISH CEMETERY, GEZAINCOURT, Somme, France

Nursing Sister, D M Y. BALDWIN, of the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital, Canadian Army Nursing Service. 30 May 1918. Grave Reference: III. A. 24.
.
Nursing Sister, A. MacPHERSON, of the Canadian Army Nursing Service. 30 May 1918. Grave Reference: III. A. 26.

Nursing Sister, EDEN LYAL PRINGLE of the Canadian Army Nursing Service. Killed in enemy air raid, 30 May 1918. Age 25. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Pringle, of 2030, 12th Avenue East, Vancouver, British Columbia. Grave Reference: III. A. 25.

ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

STEVENSON, Civilian, BERTHA GAVIN (BETTY).  Betty was a volunteer with the Young Men's Christian Association. She was killed when the aircraft involved in the air raid on Etaples on the night of 30th  May 1918 jettisoned his bombs in a field as he returned to base.,  Betty was 21 years old and had been in France since the beginning of the war.  She was awarded the Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France).  Her parents were Arthur G. and Catherine Grace Stevenson, of Harrogate, Yorks. Betty was born in York.  Grave Reference: XXVIII. M. 6.  Betty is also remembered on Harrogate War Memorial.

30th May 1918

CAMBERWELL OLD CEMETERY, London, UK
Staff Nurse BERTHA VINTNER of the 2nd London General Hospital, a member of the Territorial Force Nursing Service. Bertha died on 30th May 1918. Daughter of Mrs. Vinter, of Wyndham Rd., Camberwell, London, UK. Bertha was buried in Camberwell Old Cemetery - Grave Reference: 101. 25354.

We will remember them

Source:  The Commonwealth War Graves Commission List of Female Casualties of the First World War

Monday, 21 May 2018

Gladys Maude Mary Wake, Nursing Sister with the Canadian Army Nursing Service

Remembering Nursing Sister, GLADYS MAUDE MARY WAKE of the 1st Canadian General Hospital. Gladys was with the Canadian Army Nursing Service. She died of wounds received during an air raid by enemy aircraft on 21st May 1918 at the age of 34.  Gladys’s parents were Gervas Fountayne Wake and Amy Rosamond Wake, of Compton Hill, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK. Gladys was born in Esqlaimault, British Columbia, Canada.  She was buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France , where you will find 19 other women who died or were killed during the First World War.  The Grave Reference for Gladys Maude Mary Wake is  XXVIII. L. 5.

A Lab of One’s Own: Science and Suffrage in the First World War by Patricia Fara, published by Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2018: Book Review

“A Lab of One’s Own: Science and Suffrage in the First World War” by Patricia Fara, published by Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2018.

This is an extremely important book, which, I think, should be required reading for all school pupils because women are still a long way from being treated as equals in our society.  As Fara explains, she wrote the book because, in her view “… the main reason for studying the past is to understand the present – and the whole point of doing that is to improve the future.”

My family has commemorated the First World War for as long as I can remember – Grandfather was an Old Contemptible with the Royal Field Artillery, one Great Uncle was killed at Arras and another died at sea just 3 days before the Armistice.  In spite of that, I did not realise the extent to which women were involved in the conflict until I began researching for a series of commemorative exhibitions in May 2012.  Six years on and Fara’s book has really opened my eyes.  I did not know about most of the women Fara has included and I also learnt a lot of other vital background information. 

As a scientist herself, Fara, who, among other things, lectures on the history of science at Cambridge Unviersity, has a wealth of professional experience which is put to good use in researching this book - the bibliography alone is the most incredible work.

The book is divided into five sections – Preserving the Past, Facing the Future; Abandoning Domesticity, Working for the Vote; Corridors of Science, Crucibles of Power; Scientific Warfare, Wartime Welfare and Citizens of Science in a Post-War World.  Each section has chapters with copious notes which refer you to the bibliography and there are also illustrations throughout.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and it is extremely difficult indeed to pick out just one or two points of particular interst.  However, I particularly enjoyed reading about:  Rachel Costelloe and her fellow cricketers at Newnham College, Cambridge.  Rachel became Mrs Ray Strachey, “one of Britains most prominent suffrage campaigners” (Chapter 1).    Baden-Powell’s wife Olave, who took over the leadership of the Girl Guides during WW1, urging the girls to “prepare sandbags and collect spagnum moss” for dressing wounds. (p. 54).  Nevinson’s “The Acetylene Welder” Lithograph of 1917, which is reproduced on page 85, looks incredibly modern and Mabel Elliott’s outstanding exploits as a member of the British Military Intelligence (p. 183) must have been kept secret for so long due to the Official Secrets Act.

According to Fara, in 1918 King George V said: “When the history of our Countrys share in the war is written, no chapter will be more remarkable than that relating to the range and extent of womens participation…. Some even have fallen under the fire of the enemy.  Of all those we think today with reverent pride.” (p.271).  I wonder what happened because, since then, that participation seems to have been largely forgotten and most people only remember the Tommies and the trenches – I don’t recall any mention of the women who died while serving.  At least the Royal British Legion have amended their WW1 commemortive logo from “Every Man Remembered” to “Everyone Remembered”.

As Fara reminds us, there is no room for complacency in the 21st Century, as women still have a long way to go in the struggle for equality: “Before the First World War, suffragists could see what they were fighting against, but modern discrimination is elusive, insidious and stubbornly hard to eradicate.” (p. 285).

I urge you to read the book for yourselves.  May I suggest it be dedicated to Malala Yousafzai?

Lucy London, May 2018

Thursday, 10 May 2018

Narrelle Hobbes (1878 - 1918) - Australian Nurse, member of the British Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service in WW1

With grateful thanks to Nicki for researching Narrelle for us.  Florence Narrelle Jessie Hobbes was born in Tilba Tilba, New South Wales, Australia on 21st August 1878.  Her parents were J.F. and Margaret Hobbes.

Narrelle began her nursing course in 1903, qualifying in 1910.  She was working in Brewarrina District Hospital when the war began and travelled to England on 20th February 1915 to enlist in the QAIMNS.

Narrelle was initially posted to Malta, then Sicily and then to No. 22 Stationary Hospital, Mesopotamia (now Iraq), in May 1916.  She travelled via India where she worked briefly at Victoria War Hospital before continuing her journey to Basra.  Posted to Amara, Narrelle was based at No. 32 British General Hospital.

Narrelle became ill in June 1917.  After various treatments, she was finally diagnosed with Liver Cancer in February 1918.  Her sister travelled to take Narrelle home but Narrelle died on board the ship taking the sisters back to Australia on 10th May 1918 - the Hospital Ship HMHS "Kanowna".  She was buried at sea and is remembered on the Basra War Memorial in Iraq on Panel 43.

With many thanks to Vicki for her fantastic research.

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/P10679026

Sunday, 29 April 2018

A poem dedicated to an unknown female war Worker of the First World War by Arundel James Kennedy Esdaile

I would love to know whose grave inspired Arundel to write this poem and where it was.  In Belgium or France perhaps?

“On a War-Worker, 1916” by Arundel James Kennedy Esdaile (1880 – 1956)


Far from their homes they lie, the men who fell
Fighting, in Flanders clay or Tigris sand:
She who lies here died for the cause as well,
Whom neither bayonet killed nor bursting shell
But her own heart that loves its native land.

From ““Cambridge Poets of the Great War: An Anthology” Michael Copp (Associated University Presses, London, 2001) 

Arundel James Kennedy Esdaile was born in London on 25th April 1880.  His parents were James Kennedy Esdaile and Florence Esdaile.  His siblings were Emmeline, b. 1878, Everard, b. 1883, Millicent, b. 1884 and Percival, b. 1889.  The family lived in Sussex.

Arundel was educated at Lancing School, Sussex and Magdalene College Cambridge.  He worked at the British Museum Library.  In 1907, Arundel married Katherine Ada McDowell, whose father was Secretary of the Girl’s Public Day School Trust.  Arundel died on 22nd June 1956.

Friday, 27 April 2018

Florence Esther Benoy QMAAC

Remembering Worker (equivalent to the rank of Private), FLORENCE ESTHER BENOY, 12113. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps who died on 26th April 1918 at the age of 25. Florence was a daughter of Isaac Frank Benoy, of 6, Carlton Terrace, Birkenhead Rd., Hoylake, Cheshire. She was buried in Rake Lane Cemetery, Wallasey, Wirral, UK - Grave Reference: 7. C. of E. 19.

Gwladys Myfanwy Ryder - WW1 WAAC

A lady called Marjorie contacted me recently about her Mother, who joined the WAAC in WW1.  Marjorie said:

“About my Mother:   she was born 25th November 1900 and baptised Gwladys Myfanwy Ryder.  My Grandparents had 7 children - 5 girls and 2 boys. Her Father's name was - Earnest Edward Ryder - Mother's name Martha Beatrice Ryder.

My Mother lost her father suddenly when she was fifteen and at that time he was in the Liverpool Police force.  My mother decided to go to London and she joined the army in WW1, pretending to be older than she was.  Her brother, Ernest Edward Ryder, born 1897 also joined the army WW1 and was wounded and died 15 months later

My Mother's Father was born in Hampshire - Aldershot Barracks - in 1867.   According to reports, the family at the time moved on to India, so there must have been an Army tradition in the family.

My Mother first married a James Crombie and had 4 children. According to reports he was not a very good husband and she divorced him

My Father, Arthur Patrick Ford, born 17th February 1900, also joined up in WWI at the age of 17 yrs he was sent to Turkey and was attached to a prison camp which he did not like

My Parents did not know each other until they met in 1929. They married and had five children - one of whom died at birth.

Both my parents became Air Raid Wardens in 2nd war 1939 and therefore, were both involved with both wars - the children were evacuated to Wales and we went to live with relatives

I am trying to find a photograph of my mother in her uniform WW1."

Wednesday, 25 April 2018

ANZAC Women who died while serving during The First World War

On ANZAC Day, 25th April 2018, here is the list of Female Casualties of the First World War from Australia and New Zealand from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission:

AUSTRALIAN

ADELAIDE (WEST TERRACE) CEMETERY, South Australia, Australia

STAFFORD, Staff Nurse, MARY FLORENCE. 1 Aust. Gen. Hosp., Australian Army Nursing Service. 19 March 1919. Age 27. Grave Reference: Light Oval. 55. SE.

ALBANY PUBLIC CEMETERY (OLD), Western Australia, Australia

SAW, Staff Nurse, NELLIE, R40618. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 31 March 1919. Age 29. Grave Reference: Meth Section. Row A. Grave 1

BALLARAT (NEW) GENERAL CEMETERY, Victoria, Australia

WILLIAMS, Sister, BLODWYN ELIZABETH. Australian Army Nursing Service. 24 May 1920. Age 38. Grave Reference: Private B. 7. 28.

BEECHWORTH CEMETERY, Victoria, Australia

ROTHERY, Staff Nurse, ELIZABETH. Australian Army Nursing Service. 15 June 1918. Age 33. Grave Reference: C.E. B. 419. (GRM/3*).

BENDIGO CIVIL CEMETERY, Victoria, Australia

HENNESSY, Staff Nurse, MAY. Australian Army Nursing Service. 9 April 1919. Grave Reference: C.E. H1. 24202.

BRIGHTON GENERAL CEMETERY, VICTORIA, Victoria, Australia

McPHAIL, Staff Nurse, IRENE. Australian Army Nursing Service. 4 August 1920. Grave Reference: C.E. ZA. 1689. (GRM/3*).

FREMANTLE CEMETERY, Western Australia, Australia

THOMPSON, Staff Nurse, ADA MILDRED. Australian Army Nursing Service. 1 January 1919. Grave Reference: Ang. A. 806. (GRM/6).

PERTH WAR CEMETERY AND ANNEX, Western Australia, Australia

RIDGWAY, Staff Nurse, DORIS ALICE. Australian Army Nursing Service. 6 January 1919. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Ridgway, of Wolseley, South Australia. Grave Reference: NC1. 7.

QUARANTINE STATION, WOODMAN POINT, Western Australia, Australia

O'KANE, Staff Nurse, ROSA. Australian Army Nursing Service. 21 December 1918. Age 28. Daughter of Mrs. J. E. O'Kane, of Charters Towers, Queensland. Grave Reference: (GRM/6).

ROOKWOOD NECROPOLIS, SYDNEY, New South Wales, Australia

NUGENT, Staff Nurse, LILY. Australian Army Nursing Service. 21 February 1918. Grave Reference: R.C. L. 962.

STIRLING DISTRICT CEMETERY, South Australia, Australia

ATKINSON, Staff Nurse, BLANCHE. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 9 December 1916. Age 38. Grave Reference: General Section Grave 177/178

SWANWATER WEST GENERAL CEMETERY, Victoria, Australia

GREWAR, Sister, GERTRUDE AGNES. Australian Army Nursing Service. 24 May 1921. Grave Reference: Pres. B. 54.

SYDNEY (WAVERLEY) GENERAL CEMETERY, New South Wales, Australia

PORTER, Sister, KATHERINE AGNES LAWRENCE. R R C, Mentioned in Despatches. Australian Army Nursing Service. 16 July 1919. Grave Reference: R.C. Vault. 16. 649A. (GRM/2*).

CAIRO WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt

BICKNELL, Staff Nurse, LOUISA ANNIE. 1st General Hosp., Australian Army Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 25 June 1915. Daughter of Mrs. Eliza Bicknell, of 205, Longridge St., Abbotsford, Victoria. Grave Reference: B. 306.

MOWBRAY, Staff Nurse, NORMA VIOLET. Australian Army Nursing Service. Died of pneumonia, 21 January 1916. Age 32. Daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Barclay Mowbray, of Longville, Dickson St., Eagle Junction, Queensland. Born at St. George, Queensland. Grave Reference: D. 271.

ISMAILIA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt

WATSON, Staff Nurse, BEATRICE MIDDLETON. Australian Army Nursing Service, attd. 1st Aust. Stat. Hosp.. Died of sickness, 2 June 1916. Age 34. Daughter of William Galley Watson and Jane Ada Watson, of Middleton, Kooyong Rd., Elsternwick, Victoria. Born at Elsternwick. Grave Reference: B. 67.

LILLE SOUTHERN CEMETERY, Nord, France

MOORHOUSE, Sister, EDITH ANN. Australian Army Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 24 November 1918. Age 33. Daughter of Frederick and Deborah Moorhouse. Born at Undera, Victoria, Australia. Grave Reference: I. C. 25.

ST. SEVER CEMETERY, ROUEN, Seine-Maritime, France

KNOX, Sister, HILDA MARY. Australian Army Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 17 February 1917. Age 33. Daughter of James and Isabella Knox, of Benalla, Victoria, Australia. Grave Reference: Officers, B. 4. 10.

RIGGALL, Member, LOUISA. Australian Red Cross Society. Died of hoemorrage, 31 August 1918. Grave Reference: Officers, B. 3. 1.

WIMEREUX COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

WILSON, Sister, MYRTLE ELIZABETH. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Died of pneumonia, 23 December 1915. Age 38. Daughter of Andrew Stevens Wilson and Catherine Wilson, of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Left Queensland for Nursing Service, April, 1915. Grave Reference: III. M. 1.

MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA, Greece

MUNRO, Sister, GERTRUDE EVELYN. Australian Army Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 10 September 1918. Age 36. Daughter of Mr. A. B. and Mrs. E. P. Munro, of 5, Gillies St., Alfredton, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia. Grave Reference: 591

DELHI MEMORIAL (INDIA GATE), India

MORETON, Sister, LETETIA GLADYS. Australian Gen. Hosp. No. 2 Australian Army Nursing Service. Died of enteric, 11 November 1916. Age 26. Daughter of Samuel Henry and Letetia Dexter Moreton. Born at Brim, Victoria, Australia. Grave Reference: Face 23.

DEOLALI GOVERNMENT CEMETERY, India

CLARE, Sister, EMILY. Australian Army Nursing Service. 17 October 1918. Age 28. Daughter of Peter and Mary Clare, of 34, Lynch St., Footscray, Victoria, Australia. Grave Reference: Plot RC. Row M2. Grave 22.

KIRKEE 1914-1918 MEMORIAL, India

O'GRADY, Nursing Sister, AMY VEDA. Australian Army Nursing Service. 12 August 1916. Grave Reference: Face F.

POWER, Nursing Sister, KATHLEEN. Australian Army Nursing Service. 13 August 1916. Age 28. Daughter of Michael and Johanna Power, of Garrygauge, Piltown, Co. Kilkenny, Republic of Ireland. Grave Reference: Face F.

JOHANNESBURG (BRIXTON) CEMETERY, Gauteng, South Africa

PARROTT, Sister, AMY MAUD AUGUSTA. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 24 October 1918. Age 37. Daughter of Col. and Mrs. T. S. Parrott, of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Grave Reference: E.C. 2219.https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2003452649868322&set=p.2003452649868322&type=3  from a newspaper report about Sister Parrott of 1918

HAREFIELD (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD, Middlesex, United Kingdom

DICKINSON, Staff Nurse, RUBY. Australian Army Nursing Service. 23 June 1918. Age 32. Daughter of William and Julia Dickinson, of "Arizona," Almora St., Mosman, Queensland. Born at Forbes, New South Wales. Grave Reference: Aust. 57.

KENSAL GREEN (ALL SOULS') CEMETERY, London, United Kingdom

ASHLEY, Member, DORA, 17663. No.10 Motor Transport Repair Depot, Women's Royal Air Force. Died of pneumonia, 4 November 1918. Age 27. Daughter of E. B. and Fanny Ashley, of Woodlands, Longwarry South, Drouin, Victoria, Australia. Grave Reference: 198. 19. 460933.

LEICESTER (WELFORD ROAD) CEMETERY, Leicestershire, United Kingdom

BRENNAN, Nurse, K A. Australian Army Nursing Service. 24 November 1918. Grave Reference: Screen Wall. O1. 198.

MANCHESTER SOUTHERN CEMETERY, MANCHESTER, United Kingdom

GRANT, LYDIA W. F.  VAD – Nurse, Red Cross Unit: BRCS VAD AUSTRALIAN DETACHMENT BRISBANE 2 Died - aged 37 - at the military hospital on Ducie Avenue, Manchester (this was part of 2nd Western General Hospital) on 1st April 1917.

Her Brother Chesborough G. F. Grant was in attendance and he gave on the death certificate an address of Whytecliff, Albion, Queensland, Australia. In 1903 and 1905 Lydia was living at Lynton Norwood Street Toowong Brisbane with Emily Mary Graham Grant, Peter George Grant and John Macdonald Grant.

SUTTON VENY (ST. JOHN) CHURCHYARD, Wiltshire, United Kingdom

TYSON, Sister, FANNY ISOBEL CATHERINE. Australian Army Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 20 April 1919. Age 28. Daughter of John and Teresa Tyson, of 18, Blanche St., Elsternwick, Victoria. Born at Balranald, New South Wales. Grave Reference: 85. L. 5.

WALKER, Matron, JEAN MILES. R R C. Australian Army Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 30 October 1918. Age 39. Daughter of Alfred and Louisa Miles Walker, of "Allowah," Dunbarra Rd., Bellevue Hill, Sydney. Born in Tasmania. Grave Reference: 15. H. 1.

TOWER HILL MEMORIAL, London, United Kingdom

McMILLAN, Stewardess, (Saln.), CLARA LOUISA. "Wimmera" (Melbourne), Mercantile Marine. Killed by mine, 26 June 1918. Age 31. Daughter of Mrs. Margaret McIlwraith, of 229, Bridport St., Albert Park, Australia. 

NEW ZEALAND

ALEXANDRIA (CHATBY) MILITARY AND WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt

HAWKEN, Staff Nurse, ADA, 22/123. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Died of enteric, 28 October 1915. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Hawken, of 16, Ranfurly Rd., Epsom, Auckland, New Zealand. Grave Reference: G. 125.

MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA, Greece

ROGERS, Staff Nurse, MARGARET, 22/175. H.M. Transport Marquette, New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned, 23 October 1915. Daughter of Thomas Rogers of Beach Rd., Akaroa, Banks Peninsula, New Zealand. Grave Reference: 1833.

MIKRA MEMORIAL, Greece

BROWN, Staff Nurse, MARION SINCLAIR, 22/104. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned at sea (from H.T. "Marquette"), 23 October 1915. Daughter of Mrs. J. S. Brown, of Waiuatuku, Southland. 

CLARK, Staff Nurse, ISABEL, 22/108. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned at sea (from H.T. "Marquette"), 23 October 1915. Sister of Alexander David Clark, of Ardgowan, Oamaru. 

FOX, Staff Nurse, CATHERINE ANNE, 22/118. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned at sea (from H.T. "Marquette"), 23 October 1915. Sister of Miss M. Fox, of Hallenstein's Buildings, Auckland. Born at Otago. 

GORMAN, Staff Nurse, MARY, 22/73. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned at sea (from H.T. "Marquette"), 23 October 1915. Daughter of John and Catherine Gorman, of Arno, Waimate, Timaru. 

HILDYARD, Staff Nurse, NORA MILDRED, 22/125. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned at sea (from H.T. "Marquette"), 23 October 1915. Age 28. Daughter of Betsy Ann Hildyard, of Lyttelton, Christchurch, New Zealand, and the late William Hildyard. 

ISDELL, Staff Nurse, HELENA KATHLEEN, 22/130. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned at sea (from H.T. "Marquette"), 23 October 1915. Daughter of Mrs. H. C. Isdell, of Preston Rd., Greymouth. 

JAMIESON, Staff Nurse, MABEL ELIZABETH, 22/133. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned at sea (from H.T. "Marquette"), 23 October 1915. Daughter of Thomas Jamieson, of Church St., Kumara, Greymouth, and the late Frances Jamieson. 

RAE, Staff Nurse, MARY HELEN, 22/161. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned at sea (from H.T. "Marquette"), 23 October 1915. Age 36. Sister of Miss Robina Rae, of 25, Cambridge Terrace, Christchurch. Born at Rae's Junction, Otago. 

RATTRAY, Staff Nurse, LORNA AYLMER, 22/160. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Drowned at sea (from H.T. "Marquette"), 23 October 1915. Sister of Mr. C. W. Rattray, of Crawford St., Dunedin. 

CHRISTCHURCH (SYDENHAM) CEMETERY, Christchurch City, New Zealand  

THOMPSON, Staff Nurse, MARGARET HEPPLE, 22/486. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. 28 February 1921. Age 36. Daughter of James and Annie E. Thompson, of 67, Hackthorne Rd., Christchurch. Born at Pleasant Point. Grave Reference: Block 38C, Lot 6162.

FEATHERSTON CEMETERY, South Wairarapa District, New Zealand

LUMLEY, Nurse, CORALE. Nursing Staff., New Zealand Voluntary Aid Detachment. 25 November 1918. Grave Reference: 22.

WHISHAW, Sister, MABEL HELEN, 22/371. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. Died of influenza, 10 November 1918. Daughter of John and Katherine Whishaw, of Stoneridge, Featherston. Born at Kakaramea, South Taranaki. Grave Reference: 85.

BROOKWOOD MILITARY CEMETERY, Surrey, United Kingdom

SPEEDY, Volunteer, MISS LOUISA ELLEN. New Zealand Volunteer Worker, New Zealand Reinforcements. Died of influenza and pneumonia, 11 January 1919. Age 47. Daughter of Graham and Emily J. Speedy. Grave Reference: II. H. 1B.

DOVER (ST. MARY'S) NEW CEMETERY, Kent, United Kingdom

MABERLEY, Stewardess, E. S.S. "Maloja" (Belfast), Mercantile Marine. Drowned, as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine, or killed by mine, 27 February 1916. Age 54. Born at Dunedin, New Zealand. Grave Reference: L. M. 16.

TIDWORTH MILITARY CEMETERY, Wiltshire, United Kingdom

TUBMAN, Staff Nurse, ESTHER MAUDE, 22/517. New Zealand Army Nursing Service. 18 September 1918. Age 31. Daughter of Jane Tubman, of 43, Prince Albert Rd., st Kilda, Dunedin, and the late Edward Tubman. Grave Reference: C. 334.