Friday, 2 November 2018

Lou Henry Hoover (1874 – 1944) – American; wife of President of the United States, Herbert Hoover; served as the First Lady of the United States of America from 1929 to 1933

Lou Henry was born in Waterloo, Iowa, USA. Her parents were Charles Delano Henry, a Banker, and his wife Florence Ida, nee Weed. Lou became an accomplished horsewoman - she hunted and developed an enthusiasm for rocks, minerals, and mining.

Educated initially at the Los Angeles Normal School, now known as the University of California, Los Angeles, Lou transferred to and graduated in 1893 from San Jose Normal School, now known as San Jose State University, with a teaching certificate. She went on to study at Stanford University, where she met Herbert Hoover.  In 1898 Lou graduated, gaining a B.A. in Geology.

Herbert Hoover and Lou Henry were married in 1898 and honeymooned in Shanghai, China.  They lived in China from 1899 until August 1900.  While in China, Lou studied the Mandarin Chinese language.

During The First World War, Lou helped her husband provide relief for Belgian refugees. For her work, she was decorated in 1919 by King Albert I of Belgium. She was also involved with the American Women's War Relief Fund, which provided ambulances, funded two hospitals and provided economic opportunities for women during WWI.

Thursday, 1 November 2018

Katherine Mary Geraldine Davies (1874 – 1928) - British scientist

John Ferguson read my previous post about Katherine (25th September 2015) and contacted me as he is researching her family.  John sent me the photograph of Katherine which is from "The London Evening News" in around 1915.

Mary Davies was born on 8th December 1874.  Her parents were Sir Robert Henry Davies (1824 – 1902), Governor of the Indian Province of the Punjab from 1871 – 1877, and his wife Mary Frances, nee Cautey.

Mary was training to be a bacteriologist at the Pasteur Institute in Neuilly, France when the First World War broke out.  The American Hospital was established at the Pasteur Institute and there Mary worked with Dr. Kenneth Taylor, who was a bacteriologist who qualified at Minnesota University.   Dr Taylor was working on a serum of Quinine Hydrochloride to treat Gas Gangrene, experimenting initially on guinea pigs.

In October 1915, Mary deliberately injected herself with the bacteria used to infect the guinea pigs and asked Dr. Taylor to treat her.   The treatment was successful and after some days in hospital, Mary was sent home to England to recuperate.  She wrote a treatise suggesting that if the cloth used to manufacture British Army uniforms were treated with Quinine Hydrochloride, the incidences of Gas Gangrene might be reduced.

It is perhaps worth noting here, that the Canadian Army Doctor, artilleryman and poet, John McCrae, commented upon his shock on discovering that the heavy use of manure used to fertilise the fields in Flanders and northern France, contributed to the infection of wounds sustained by soldiers on the battle fields of the Western Front in the First World War.

Mary, a member of the Bath Club in London, died in Cannes, France on 7th February 1928.

With many thanks to Geoff Harrison and other friends who sent me links to articles about Mary, and to ‘The Times’ for re-printing the story they ran about Mary's exploit from their edition of September 23rd 1915 in their 23rd September 2015 edition

And to John Ferguson for the photograph of Mary - photographer unknown.

Geoff also found an amazing cartoon which illustrates this story from the St. Petersburg Times of 9th August 1931 (I imagine that would be St. Petersburg in Florida...).

Sources:

GRAVES, Diane. "A Crown of Live The World of John McCrae" (Spellmount Ltd., Staplehurst, Kent, 1997)

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=888&dat=19310809&id=6q0KAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0U0DAAAAIBAJ&pg=7255%2C775711&hl=en

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=wm#inbox/14ffba82a4a760bc?projector=1http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/16453665

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/16453665

http://www.rcn.org.uk/development/library_and_heritage_services/library_collections/rcn_archive/historical_nursing_journals/browse_journals?sq_content_src=%2BdXJsPWh0dHAlM0ElMkYlMkZyY25hcmNoaXZlLnJjbi5vcmcudWslMkZkYXRhJTJGVk9MVU1FMDU1LTE5MTUlMkZwYWdlMjcyLXZvbHVtZTU1LTAybmRvY3RvYmVyMTkxNS5wZGYmYWxsPTE%3D

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1499&dat=19151111&id=_mkWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=_iAEAAAAIBAJ&pg=1788,4736926&hl=en

http://journals.lww.com/ajnonline/Citation/1928/04000/For_Americans_in_France_.2.aspx

Saturday, 6 October 2018

The Spirit of British Womanhood, Agnes Conway and the commemoration of women in WW1 at the Imperial War Museum

Following the setting up of the Imperial War Museum in London in 1917, The Women's Work Subcommittee came into being.  The first meeting of the Subcommittee took place on 26th April 1917.  Among the members were Agnes Conway and Lady Priscilla Norman, who had run a hospital in France during the first few months of the war. Co-helpers on the Women's Work Subcommittee were Lady Asquith, Lady Mond and Lady Haig.

The first report of the Subcommittee laid down its objectives as the collection of exhibits and the formation of a record of war activities by women by means of a collection of photographs, pamphlets and manuscript reports from all women’s organisations and outstanding private individuals.  If we are able to find information and photographs today, it is due entirely to the work of the Subcommittee.


Agnes Conway - historian and archaeologist. From 1917-1929, Agnes collected information concerning women's work in the First World War as Chairman of the Women's Work Sub-Committee of the Imperial War Museum in London. Her father, Martin Conway, was first the honorary Director-General of the IWM. 

Florence Priscilla, Lady Norman, CBE JP, née McLaren (1883 – 1 March 1964) – In 1907, Florence married Sir Henry Norman, 1st Baronet, a noted journalist and later Liberal MP for Blackburn, Lancashire. During the First World War, Lady Norman ran a voluntary hospital in Wimereux, France with her husband. She was awarded the Mons Star for her services and created a CBEfor her war services.

Lady Mond – Violet Florence Mabel, nee Goetze - turned her country home into a convalescent home for the wounded and took Belgian refugees into her London home.  In 1920, she was appointed DBE (Dame of the British Empire) for her work during WW1.

Lady Asquith - Emma Alice Margaret Asquith, Countess of Oxford and Asquith (née Tennant) 2 February 1864 – 28 July 1945 - was known as Margot Asquith. She was the second wife of Herbert Asquith, British Prime Minister from 1908 until 1916.

Lady Haig – The Hon. Dorothy Maud Vivian, daughter of 3rd Baron Vivian and his wife Louisa Alice Duff, was a bridesmaid to Queen Alexandra. She met Douglas Haig while he was a guest of King Edward VII at Windsor Castle. They married in the private chapel at Buckingham Palace in July 1905.  During the First World War, Countess Haig worked with the Red Cross, and was appointed a Lady of Grace of St John of Jerusalem. She suggested that a factory, employing those men disabled by war, should be started to make poppies for Scotland.

Sources:
https://www.ladyhaigspoppyfactory.org.uk/factory-history/the-start/
https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/a-closer-look-at-the-womens-work-collection
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Norman



Wednesday, 3 October 2018

Some of the women who served and died or were killed during WW1 in October 1918


Working from the 95 pages of the Commonwealth War Graves List of Female Casualties of the First World War here are those listed who died or were killed in October 1918.

The CWGC List does not include women killed in Munitions Factories explosions or accidents etc.

2nd October
Member, ETHEL MAUD LILIAN RICHARDS of the Women's Royal Air Force died on 2nd October 1918, at the age of 26. Her parents were William Henry and Maria Richards, of Cwmbran, Monmouthshire.  Ethel was buried in Shorncliffe Military Cemetery in Kent, UK - Grave Reference: O. 679.


3rd
Sister, MABEL EDITH GRIGSON, who served in the Royal Navy Hospital in Malta. Sister Grigson was a member of The Queen Alexandra's Royal Naval Nursing Service.  Her parents were George and Esther Grigson.  Sister Grigson died on 3rd October 1918, at the age of 36 and was buried in Malta Capuccini Naval Cemetery, Malta - Grave Reference: Prot. 60.

4th
ORESTONE METHODIST BURIAL GROUND, Devon, UK
WILLS, Member, SUSAN S., G/847. Women's Royal Naval Service, attd., Royal Air Force. 4 October 1918. Age 36. Grave Reference: Row 4. from east wall.

5th
ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN, Seine-Maritime, France
HOLBOROW, Forewoman, ROSE MABEL, 1923. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps, attd. 1st Base Mechanical Transport Depot.. 5 October 1918. Grave Reference: S. V. H. 3.

SHERBORNE CEMETERY, Dorset, UK
STACEY, Staff Nurse, DOROTHY LOUISE, 2/R/S/519. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 5 October 1918. Age 25. Daughter of Alfred John and Mary M. Stacey, of Charlton Horethorne, Dorset. Grave Reference: 17. 257.

and

Annie POPPLEWELL of the Women’s Land Army, Other Empire Force, who died as a result of a ploughing accident on 5th Octobr 1918. 
https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/a-closer-look-at-the-womens-work-collection


8th
MAZARGUES WAR CEMETERY, MARSEILLES, Bouches-du-Rhone, France
DAVIS, Driver, MILDRED CONSTANCE. French Red Cross Society. Died from pneumonia, while working with the French Croix Rouge as Ambulance Driver, 8 October 1918. Age 25. Daughter of the Rev. Edward Smith, Rector of Hazelbury-Bryan, Sturminster Newton, Dorset; wife of the late Capt. R. N. Davis. Grave Reference: III. A. 58.

BROOKWOOD CEMETERY, Surrey, UK
TULLOCH, Staff Nurse, EDITH SARAH, 2/ResT/95. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 8 October 1918. Age 33. Daughter of John Cromarty Tulloch and Amelia Clarke Tulloch. Grave Reference: H. 181689.

9th
LIVERPOOL (TOXTETH PARK) CEMETERY, Lancashire, UK
ING Worker (equivalent to the rank of Private) ELSIE UXBRIDGE ING, No. 50823 of The Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps.  Elsie’s parents were Charles Westray Ing, a retired publican, and Clara Ing, nee Williamson, of Bloom Street, Falkner Street, Liverpool. Elsie had the following siblings:  Robert, Beatrice, Harry and Harold.  Elsie served in the Army Service Corps and was attached to 613th Mechanical Transport Company.  She died on 9th October 1918 at the age of 20 and was buried in Toxteth Park Cemetery in Liverpool - Grave Reference: I. C.E. 208.

ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France
GREEN, Nursing Sister, MATILDA E.. 7th Canadian Gen. Hosp., Canadian Army Nursing
Service. Died of disease, 9 October 1918. Age 32. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Green, of Virden, Manitoba. Graduate, Medicine Hat Gen. Hosp., Alberta, Canada. Grave Reference: XLVIII. A. 10.

MAZARGUES WAR CEMETERY, MARSEILLES, Bouches-du-Rhone, France
DAVIS, Driver, MILDRED CONSTANCE. French Red Cross Society. Died from pneumonia, while working with the French Croix Rouge as Ambulance Driver, 8 October 1918. Age 25. Daughter of the Rev. Edward Smith, Rector of Hazelbury-Bryan, Sturminster Newton, Dorset; wife of the late Capt. R. N. Davis. Grave Reference: III. A. 58.

10th
BRIDGEND CEMETERY, Glamorganshire, UK
MARK, Remembering Nurse HANNAH DUNLOP MARK of The Territorial Force Nursing Service. Hannah died on 10th October 1918 at the age of 23. Her parents were Alex and Sarah Jane Mark, of "Garnock," Acland Road, Bridgend. She was buried in Bridgend Cemetery, Glamorganshire, UK - Grave Reference: D. 4.

HOLLYBROOK MEMORIAL, SOUTHAMPTON, Hampshire, UK
BARRETT, Nurse, SOPHIA VIOLET. Voluntary Aid Detachment. Drowned at sea (from R.M.S. "Leinster"), 10th October 1918.  Sophia is remembered on Hollybrook Memorial in Southampton.

Also

Delia Davoren and her sister Nora Davoren nursed in WW1 in Northampton.  They were from Co. Clare in Ireland and were drowned when the RMS “Leinster” was sunk.

Nurse Nellie Hogan from Newmarket-on-Fergus, Co. Clare, Ireland was drowned when the RMS “Leinster” was sunk.

Margaret O’Grady and her sister Mary O’Grady were both nurses from Quin, Co. Clare. They were daughters of Francis O'Grady, Manse, Quin, Co. Clare. Margaret and Mary were travelling together on the RMS “Leinster”. Margaret was drowned when the ship was sunk on 10 October 1918 and her sister was rescued.  Margaret was buried at Quin Abbey. 

HOLYHEAD (MAESHYFRYD) BURIAL BOARD CEMETERY, Anglesey, UK
OWEN, Stewardess, HANNAH. S.S. "Leinster.", Mercantile Marine. 10 October 1918. Age 36. Daughter of William and Mary Owen, of 2, Tower Gardens, Holyhead. Grave Reference: B. 890.  (See photo)

PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Devon, UK
CARR, Clerk, (shorthand typist), JOSEPHINE, G/4985. W.R.N.S., Women's Royal Naval Service. Killed in action in S.S. "Leinster" with submarine in Irish Sea, 10 October 1918. Age 19. Daughter of Kathleen Carr, of 4, Bethesda Row, Blackrock Rd., Cork, and the late Samuel Carr. Grave Reference: 31. Mary Josephine Carr, drowned in the Irish Sea when the SS Leinster was torpedoed on 10 October 1918. Mary was born on 13 May 1897 in Cork, Ireland to Kathleen and Samuel Carr.  Mary enrolled with the Women's Royal Naval Service on 1 October 1918 as a Clerk. She died 9 days later. Her name is recorded on Plymouth Naval Memorial. (see photo Pictures)

MOUNT JEROME CEMETERY, County Dublin, Ireland
MELLETT, Nursing Sister, HENRIETTA. 15th Can. Gen. Hosp., Canadian Army Medical Corps. Died in the sinking of R.M.S. "Leinster", 10 October 1918. Age 39. Grave Reference: 410. A62.

GRANGEGORMAN MILITARY CEMETERY, County Dublin, Ireland

WESTWELL, Assistant Administrator, MAY. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps.
Drowned at sea (from R.M.S. "Leinster"), 10 October 1918. Age 30. Daughter of Ellen Westwell, of 103, Lovely Lane, Warrington, and the late W. W. Westwell. Grave Reference: CE. Officers. 30.

PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Devon, UK
CARR, Clerk, (shorthand typist), JOSEPHINE, G/4985. W.R.N.S., Women's Royal Naval Service. Killed in action in S.S. "Leinster" with submarine in Irish Sea, 10 October 1918. Age 19. Daughter of Kathleen Carr, of 4, Bethesda Row, Blackrock Rd., Cork, and the late Samuel Carr. Grave Reference: 31. Mary Josephine Carr, drowned in the Irish Sea when the SS Leinster was torpedoed on 10 October 1918.

TOWER HILL MEMORIAL, London, UK
PARRY, Stewardess, LOUISA. S.S. "Leinster" (Dublin), Mercantile Marine. Drowned, as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine, 10 October 1918. Age 22. Daughter of Owen and Katherine Parry (Nee Williams), of 5, Fair View, Holyhead, Anglesey.

11th
WOOLWICH CEMETERY, London, UK
CROSS, Member, AMELIA, 5981. 7th Aeroplane Acceptance Park, Women's Royal Air Force. Died of sickness, 11 October 1918. Age 27. Grave Reference: 20. 518.


12th
ST. JEAN-SUR-RICHELIEU ROMAN CATHOLIC CEMETERY, QUEBEC, Quebec, Canada
ALPAUGH, Nursing Sister, AGNES E.. Canadian Army Medical Corps. Died of pneumonia, 12 October 1918. Age 26. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Alpaugh, of St. John's, P.Q. Grave Reference: L. 602.
TOURGEVILLE MILITARY CEMETERY, Calvados, France
HILLING, Sister, SOPHIE, 2/RES.H/1339. A R R C (Royal Red Cross Medal). Sophie was born Sophia Hilling in Deptford, London, UK in 1885.  Her parents were Samuel Hilling ((b. 1857) and his wife Sarah A. Hilling (b. 1885) from Suffolk. Sophia had a brother Samuel, born in 1884 and a sister Rose, born in 1886.  Sophia trained as a nurse in Birmingham and joined the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service during WW1. She was awarded the Royal Red Cross Medal in October 1917 when she was working at the Welsh Metropolitain War Hospital in Cardiff, Wales.

Sophia died of pneumonia on 12th October 1918 after four years war service, while working at No.72 General Hospital, Trouville.  She was buried in Tourgeville Military Cemetery, Calvados, France - Grave Reference: XIV. A. 1. At the time of Sophia’s death, the family lived in Deptford, London.   Sophia is remembered on the Roll of Honour in Deptford Town Hall, London. http://lewishamwarmemorials.wikidot.com/info:royal-red-cross-medal
Alain Caryon visits Sophia’s grave regularly.

GAZA WAR CEMETERY, Israel and Palestine
DANAHER, Staff Nurse, MARY. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service, Reserve. 12 October 1918. Age 26. Daughter of Mrs. A. Danaher, of Glenagore, Athea, Co. Limerick. Grave Reference: XXVII. B. 5.

13th
MONT HUON MILITARY CEMETERY, LE TREPORT, Seine-Maritime, France
TONKIN, Member, EDITH MARY, 14673. 3rd Gen. Hospital, Voluntary Aid Detachment. Died of disease, 13 October 1918. Age 26. Daughter of Walter John and Elizabeth Tonkin, of Brook Road, Ely, near Cardiff. Native of Cardiff. Grave Reference: VIII. M. 14.

BALLYCUMBER (LISS) CHURCHYARD, County Offaly, Ireland
HACKETT, Nurse, VENICE CLEMENTINE HENRIETTA. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 13 October 1918. Daughter of Edward A. Hackett, of Castletown Park, Ballycumber. Grave Reference: In South-West part.

CAPE TOWN (PLUMSTEAD) CEMETERY, Western Cape, South Africa
WARDLE, Staff Nurse, IDA. South African Military Nursing Service. 13 October 1918. Grave Reference: Bl. UN. 27.

14th
MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA, Greece
RICHARDS, Nurse, ELLA. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 14 October 1918. Age 31.
Daughter of Timothy Richards, J.P., of Ardwyn, Lampeter, Cardiganshire. Grave Reference: 542.

STONE (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD, WORCESTERSHIRE, Worcestershire, UK
MADDOCKS, Worker, DOROTHY BATEMAN, 35056. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 14 October 1918. Age 17. Daughter of Mrs. E. L. Maddocks, of Stone Cottage, Crabb's Cross, Redditch, Worcs. Grave Reference: South of Church.

TOTTENHAM CEMETERY, Middlesex, UK
MEIKLE, Nurse, CATHERINE. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 14 October 1918. Age 23. Grave Reference: Gen. 7301 (Screen Wall).

TOWER HILL MEMORIAL, London, UK
CREEGAN, Stewardess, MARGARET. S.S. "Dundalk" (Dundalk), Mercantile Marine.
Drowned, as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine, 14 October 1918. Age 38.
Daughter of Patrick Creegan, of Point Rd., Dundalk, Co. Louth, and the late Mary Creegan.


16th October

CONINGSBY CEMETERY, Lincolnshire, UK
WILLSON, Staff Nurse, NELLIE. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 16 October 1918. Age 30. Daughter of Arthur Willson, of 5, Queen St., Billinghay.  Alternative Commemoration - buried in Billinghay (St. Michael) Church Cemetery. Grave Reference: Spec. Memorial.



17th October

Southampton (Hollybrook) Cemetery

Staff Nurse Annie Elinor BUCKLER of The QAIMNS, died on 17th October 1918.  Her parents were the Rev. John Findlay Buckler a Rector of Bidston and Mary Annie Buckler, nee Mullow.  Annie, who was born in Chester and trained at the Manchester Children’s Hospital, served in Malta and at the Queen’s Hospital, Sidcup, Kent, where she was part of the team that pioneered the work of plastic surgery.

GAZA WAR CEMETERY, Israel and Palestine

GLEDHILL, Sister, ANNIE. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service, Reserve. 17 October 1918. Age 43. Daughter of James Edward and Mary Gledhill, of Steeton, Yorks. Grave Reference: XXVII. C. 13.

POTCHEFSTROOM MILITARY CEMETERY, North West, South Africa
EDMEADES, Nursing Sister, CONSTANCE ALEXANDRA. South African Military Nursing Service. 17 October 1918. Age 28. Daughter of E. T. L. and M. F. Edmeades, of Pinehurst, Oudtshoorn, Cape Province. Grave Reference: C.E. 573.

DEOLALI GOVERNMENT CEMETERY, India
CLARE, Sister, EMILY. Australian Army Nursing Service. 17 October 1918. Age 28. Daughter of Peter and Mary Clare, of 34, Lynch St., Footscray, Victoria, Australia. Grave Reference: Plot RC. Row M2. Grave 22.

POTCHEFSTROOM MILITARY CEMETERY, North West, South Africa
EDMEADES, Nursing Sister, CONSTANCE ALEXANDRA. South African Military Nursing Service. 17 October 1918. Age 28. Daughter of E. T. L. and M. F. Edmeades, of Pinehurst, Oudtshoorn, Cape Province. Grave Reference: C.E. 573.

CARNMONEY CEMETERY, County Antrim, UK
TWADDELL, Member, MAUDE ELIZABETH, 50290. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 17 October 1918. Grave Reference: G. 95.

CLIVEDEN WAR CEMETERY, Buckinghamshire, UK
BAKER, Nursing Sister, MIRIAM EASTMAN. Canadian Army Medical Corps. 17 October 1918. Age 32. Grave Reference: 5. See photo saved in Pictures.

SOUTHAMPTON (HOLLYBROOK) CEMETERY, Hampshire, UK
BUCKLER, Staff Nurse, ANNIE ELINOR. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing
Service. Died of influenza, 17 October 1918. Age 43. Daughter of the Rev. John Findlay Buckler, M.A., late Rector of Bidston, Cheshire, and of Mary Anne Buckler (nee Mutlow). Served at Malta and Sidcup, Kent. Born at Chester. Grave Reference: B. 01. 84.





18th
KENSAL GREEN (ALL SOULS') CEMETERY, London, UK
AMBROSE, Member, BLANCHE A., 13034. Women's Royal Air Force. 18 October 1918. Age 34. Grave Reference: 198. 18. 46006. (Screen Wall.)..

ARBROATH WESTERN CEMETERY, Angus, UK
BENNET, Staff Nurse, HELENA STEWART. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 18 October 1918. Grave Reference: H. 583.

GREAT HENNY (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD, Essex, UK
GALLEY, Worker, AMY COOTE, 6886. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Died of influenza, 18 October 1918. Age 21. Daughter of William and Frances Ann Galley, of Little Hickbush Great Henny. Grave Reference: 6886.

MACHEN (ST. JOHN) CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, Monmouthshire, UK
M. WOODRUFF, ShorthandTypist,  No. G/2609 of The Women's Royal Naval Service. 18 October 1918. Grave Reference: I. 10.

READING CEMETERY, Berkshire, UK
NEISH, Worker, A. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 18 October 1918. Age 32. Daughter of William Neish, of "Elem," Pilford Heath, Wimbourne, Dorset. Grave Reference: 80. 16489.


19th
LISTOWEL (FAIRVIEW) CEMETERY, Ontario, Canada
ROGERS, Nursing Sister, NELLIE GRACE. Canadian Army Medical Corps. 19 October 1918. Age 29. Daughter of James and Adelia Rogers, of Listowel, Ont. Grave Reference: Lot 5. Range 10.

OLD MONKLAND CEMETERY, Lanarkshire, UK
MACKENZIE, Member, HELEN, 15076. Stores (Netheravon), Women's Royal Air Force. Died of pneumonia, 19 October 1918. Age 20. Daughter of Donald and Annie McIver Mackenzie, of 11, English Buildings, Calderbank, Airdrie, Lanarkshire.

20th
CAPE TOWN (PLUMSTEAD) CEMETERY, Western Cape, South Africa
HEARNS, Staff Nurse, BEATRICE. South African Military Nursing Service. 20 October 1918. Grave Reference: Bl. UN. 28.

ECCLESFIELD JEWISH CEMETERY, Yorkshire, UK
HARTMAN, Nurse, EMILY. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 20 October 1918. Grave Reference: Grave 271

21st
CAPE TOWN (PLUMSTEAD) CEMETERY, Western Cape, South Africa
BEAUFORT, Nurse, K. South African Military Nursing Service. 21 October 1918. Grave Reference: Bl. UN. 31.

WATKINS, Staff Nurse, J K. South African Military Nursing Service. 21 October 1918. Grave Reference: Bl. UN. 30.


CAPE TOWN (PLUMSTEAD) CEMETERY, Western Cape, South Africa
BEAUFORT, Nurse, K. South African Military Nursing Service. 21 October 1918. Grave Reference: Bl. UN. 31.

YORK CEMETERY, YORKSHIRE, Yorkshire, UK
WHITWORTH, Worker, NELLIE, 16451. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps, attd. No. 2
Inf. Records (York). Died of sickness, 21 October 1918. Age 26. Daughter of Mary Whitworth, of 28, Rosslyn St., Clifton, York, and the late Benson Whitworth. Grave Reference: 43. 5083.

22nd
CHURCH AND CLAYTON-LE-MOORS JOINT CEMETERY, Lancashire, UK
BARON, Nurse, MARGARET ALICE BARON East Lancashire section of the Voluntary Aid Detachment. Margaret was born in Burnley, Lancashire in 1891.  Margaret’s parents were William Thomas Baron and his wife Alice Baron, nee Myers.  Margaret had the following siblings:  Sarah, b. 1885, Elizabeth H., b. 1887, Ellen, b. 1888 and Caroline, b. 1894.

Margaret died on 22nd October 1918, at the age of 28 and was buried with full military honours in Church and Clayton-le-Moors Joint Cemetery, Lancashire, UK - Grave Reference: E. C.E. 107.  Margaret is also remembered on the memorial doors near the Seven Sisters window in York Minster.  The photograph of Margaret’s grave was kindly taken by Andrew Mackay who visited the grave recently.

Dusty Mears has researched Margaret and visits her grave regularly. Dusty, who shared the photograph of Margaret says: “Nurse Baron was from Clayton-le-Moors, Accrington, Lancashire UK. She was a weaver but interested in nursing. She nursed in Elmfield Hall, which was a WW1 Auxiliary Military Hospital in Accrington during WW1. During the First World War, Margaret volunteered for general service, eventually ending up at the Royal Marine Infirmaty in Deal, Kent, where she died from influenza. There's a novel loosely based on her life – “Silence Unlocked” by Margaret’s Great-Niece, Janet M. Reeves.” Dusty’s research brought about distant family members getting in touch with each other in 2014/15. Well done, Dusty.
(see photos)

STAGLIENO CEMETERY, GENOA, Italy

WRIGHT, Staff Nurse, HANNAH ELIZABETH. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Died of pneumonia, 22nd October 1918. Eldest daughter of John and Emma Wright, of Newcastle-on-Tyne. Grave Reference: I. C. 23.

TOTTENHAM CEMETERY, Middlesex, UK
CROWTHER, Sister, LENA. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 22
October 1916. Grave Reference: Gen. 7301 (Screen Wall).

ALDERSHOT MILITARY CEMETERY, Hampshire, UK
SQUIRE, Member, DOROTHY J.. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 22 October 1918. Grave Reference: Plot AG Grave 377.

PORTLAND (ST. GEORGE) CHURCHYARD, Dorset, UK
WHITE, Clerk, DOROTHY MARIA, G/5160. H.M.S. "Research.", Women's Royal Naval Service. Died of sickness, 22 October 1918. Age 20. Daughter of William and Rebecca White, of 21, Cove Cottages, Portland. Grave Reference: A. 4. 18.

23rd

CROYDON (MITCHAM ROAD) CEMETERY, Surrey, UK
COTTON, Worker, ROSE, 44785. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 23 October 1918. Age 26. Daughter of Charles Cotton, of 57, Sangley Rd., South Norwood, London. Grave Reference: R7. 1632.

BEDFORD CEMETERY, BEDFORDSHIRE, Bedfordshire, UK
DAWES, Nursing Sister, A E, 2/RES.D/369. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 23 October 1918. Grave Reference: F/4. 169.

LADYWELL CEMETERY, London, UK
GRAY, Member, FLORENCE ANNIE, 20267.  No. 1 Stores Depot (Kidbrooke), Women's Royal Air Force. Died of pneumonia, 23 October 1918. Age 39. Wife of W. H. Gray, of 80A, Stondon Park, London. Grave Reference: G. 43.

RYDE BOROUGH CEMETERY, Isle of Wight, UK
ROGERS, Worker, MARIE LOUISE, 17389. 18th O.C. Bn., Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 23 October 1918. Age 34. Daughter of Mrs. Mary Charlotte Rogers, of Granville House, Nelson St., Ryde, Isle of Wight. Grave Reference: NG. K. 3263.

SHORNCLIFFE MILITARY CEMETERY, Kent, UK
HENNAN, Nursing Sister, VICTORIA BELLE. Canadian Army Medical Corps. 23 October 1918. Age 31. Daughter of Dorothy Catherine Hennan, of Elkhorn, Manitoba. Grave Reference: M. 694.

24th
ALDERSHOT MILITARY CEMETERY, Hampshire, UK
TICHBORNE, Nurse, MURIEL EDITH ELIZABETH. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 24 October 1918. Age 25. Grave Reference: Plot AG Grave 376.

DOVER (CHARLTON) CEMETERY, Kent, UK
BOWMAN, Clerk, HILDA, G/762. Women's Royal Naval Service. 24 October 1918.
Daughter of Mrs. Martha Bowman, of 28, De Burgh Hill, Dover. Grave Reference: I. H. 13.

TOTTENHAM CEMETERY, Middlesex, UK

JOHNSON, Sister, ADA MARION. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 24 October 1918. Age 24. Daughter of J. H. and Mary A. Johnson, of 1, Arthur Rd., Motspur Park, New Malden, Surrey. Grave Reference: Gen. 7301. (Screen Wall).
BROOKWOOD CEMETERY, Surrey, UK
COLE, Sister, DOROTHY HELEN. 1st London General Hospital, Territorial Force Nursing
Service. Died of pneumonia, 24 October 1918. Age 29. Daughter of William and Caroline Frances Cole, of 41, Heath Hurst Rd., Hampstead, London. Grave Reference: 181855.

BROOKWOOD (UNITED KINGDOM 1914-1918) MEMORIAL, Surrey, UK
PEAKE, Worker, SUSAN JANE, 47444. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 24 October 1918. Age 27. Daughter of Robert Peake. Grave Reference: Addenda Panel

JOHANNESBURG (BRIXTON) CEMETERY, Gauteng, South Africa
PARROTT, Sister, AMY MAUD AUGUSTA. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 24 October 1918. Age 37. Daughter of Col. and Mrs. T. S. Parrott, of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Grave Reference: E.C. 2219. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2003452649868322&set=p.2003452649868322&type=3 from a newspaper report about Sister Parrott of 1918

TOTTENHAM CEMETERY, Middlesex, UK
JOHNSON, Sister, ADA MARION. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service.
Died of sickness, 24 October 1918. Age 24. Daughter of J. H. and Mary A. Johnson, of 1, Arthur Rd., Motspur Park, New Malden, Surrey. Grave Reference: Gen. 7301. (Screen Wall).

26th
EDINBURGH (ROSEBANK) CEMETERY, Edinburgh, UK
THOMSON, Sister, ELIZABETH ROBERTSON. Leith War Hospital, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 26 October 1918. Age 36. Daughter of Jane Thomson, and the late Capt George Thomson. Grave Reference: S. E/60.

GOSPORT (ANN'S HILL) CEMETERY, Hampshire, UK
Commonwealth War Dead (1914-1918)
BILLINGTON, Worker, SARAH, 48452. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 26 October 1918. Age 28. Daughter of John and Sarah Billington, of 3, Jackson Place, Stoke, Devonport. Grave Reference: 38. 23842.

GUILDFORD (STOKE) OLD CEMETERY, Surrey, UK
CHALLINOR, Staff Nurse, ELIZABETH ANNIE, 2/ResC/747. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Died of pneumonia, 26 October 1918. Age 29. Daughter of Samuel and Sarah Challinor, of "Thelma," Caxton Gardens, Guildford. Grave Reference: D. 592.

LLANDINGAT (ST. DINGAT) CHURCHYARD, Carmarthenshire, UK
Commonwealth War Dead (1914-1918)
DAVIES, Chief Section Leader, C J, G/3136. Women's Royal Naval Service. 26 October 1918. Grave Reference: In South part.



27th
CARDIFF WESTERN CEMETERY, Glamorganshire, UK
Commonwealth War Dead (1914-1918)
SAINT, Assistant Waitress, LUCY JANE, 5558. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 27
October 1918 at Royal Victoria Hospital Boscombe, Hampshire
Age 23. Daughter of Samuel and Lucy Saint, of 4, Club Row, Tranch, Pontypool. Alternative Commemoration - buried in Llanfihangel Pontymoel (St. Michael) Churchyard. Grave Reference: Screen Wall.   For photo see http://www.womenandwar.wales/search.php?func=search&searchfor=QMAAC&in_unit=on
Commemorated on War Memorial gates, Grave St Michael, Pontypool, Monmouthshire

Notes: aged 23. Buried Llanfihangel Pontymoel churchyard, Pontypool.

LAMBETH CEMETERY, London, UK
PATRICK, Worker, LILIAN PRETORIA, 46891. Clerical Staff, Queen Mary's Army
Auxiliary Corps. Died of pneumonia, 27 October 1918. Age 19. Daughter of William and Lucy Patrick, of Fore St., St. Columb, Cornwall. Grave Reference: Screen Wall. H.3. 930.

LIMERICK (ST. LAWRENCE'S) CATHOLIC CEMETERY, County Limerick,

McMAHON, Volunteer, AGNES, 18691. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps, attd. Officer's Cadet School, Kildare. 27 October 1918. Age 22. Daughter of Mrs. Mary McMahon, of 14, Prospect, Rossbrien, Limerick. Grave Reference: 32180.

MURTON (HOLY TRINITY) CHURCHYARD, Durham, UK
ELLIOTT, Nurse, ELIZABETH. Territorial Force Nursing Service. 27 October 1918. Age 24. Daughter of Thomas and Alice Elliott, of 6, Pilgrim St., Murton. Grave Reference: Near West wall of Churchyard.

SOUTHAMPTON (HOLLYBROOK) CEMETERY, Hampshire, UK

STANLEY, Member, MARY ANN, 16220. 1st Salvage Sect., Women's Royal Air Force. Died of pneumonia, 27 October 1918. Age 23. Daughter of Mrs. Smith, of 19, Market St., Stoneywood, Bucksburn, Aberdeenshire. Grave Reference: L. 7. 206.

28th
KENSAL GREEN (ALL SOULS') CEMETERY, London, UK
SMITHERST, Member, DOROTHY M., 11318. Women's Royal Air Force. 28 October 1918. Age 23. Grave Reference: 198. 18. 46053. (Screen Wall.).

GLENBORO (BRU FRIKIRK JU LUTHERAN CHURCH) CEMETERY, Manitoba, Canada
FREDERICKSON, Nursing Sister, CHRISTINE. Canadian Army Medical Corps. Died of pneumonia, 28 October 1918. Age 22. Daughter of Frederick and G.S. Frederickson, of Glenborough, Manitoba, Canada.

KILLESHIN CHURCH OF IRELAND CHURCHYARD, County Leix, Ireland

McMAHON, Mechanic Driver, AUGUSTA MARY. Women's Legion, attd., Army Service Corps. 28 October 1918. Grave Reference: About 5 yards South of Church.

CAMBERWELL OLD CEMETERY, London, UK
WILLIAMS, Member, EDITH OLIVE, 21181. 1st Stores Depot., Women's Royal Air Force. 28 October 1918. Age 19. Daughter of Alice M. Greenfield, of 10A, Staveley Rd., Asylum Rd., Peckham, London. Grave Reference: 101. 25607. Screen Wall.

CHELTENHAM CEMETERY, PRESTBURY, Gloucestershire, UK
ROBERTS, Member, ELIZABETH HANNAH JANE, 22635. Women's Royal Air Force,
attd. 9th School of Aeronautics. Died of pneumonia, 28 October 1918. Age 22. Daughter of the late John Roberts, of Hanover St., St. Paul's, Cheltenham. Grave Reference: O. 2107.

DOVER (ST. MARY'S) NEW CEMETERY, Kent, UK

CARE, Member, M L, G/5721. Women's Royal Naval Service. 28 October 1918. Grave Reference: G. J. 1.


PLYMOUTH (FORD PARK) CEMETERY, Devon, UK

JONES, Sister, LILIAN HILDA, 2/J/110. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Died of pneumonia, 28 October 1918. Age 32. Daughter of Louisa Jones, of "Fairlight," 13, Valencia Rd., West Worthing, Sussex. Born in New Southgate, London. Grave Reference: General K. 5. 7.

29th
DALBEATTIE CEMETERY, Kirkcudbrightshire, UK
WRIGHT, Worker, JEANNIE TURNBULL, 46868. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Died of pneumonia, 29 October 1918. Age 20. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wright, of The Galla, Dalbeattie. Grave Reference: 4A. 1st Extn. 23.

HEMEL HEMPSTEAD (HEATH LANE) CEMETERY, Hertfordshire, UK
HARROLD, Worker, (Waitress), HELEN CHARLOTTE, 50021. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 29 October 1918. Grave Reference: YB. 46.

HULL WESTERN CEMETERY, Yorkshire, UK
BREWER, Forewoman, KATE SWINN, 51519. Gateshead Hostel, Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 29 October 1918. Age 30. Daughter of Charles Albert and Elizabeth Colledge Brewer. Grave Reference: 309. 29972.

LEEDS (BECKETT STREET) CEMETERY, Yorkshire, UK
LAMBERT, Member, EMILY, 15358. Women's Royal Air Force. 29 October 1918. Grave Reference: 20287.

NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE (ST. ANDREW'S AND JESMOND) CEMETERY,
Northumberland, UK
TODD, Worker, BARBARA RAMSEY, 41144. 23rd Officers' Cadet Bn., Hepswell, Catterick, Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 29 October 1918. Age 26. Daughter of W. George Todd, of 16, Chester St., Newcastle-on-Tyne. Grave Reference: N. U. 23.

PEEBLES CEMETERY, Peeblesshire, UK
AINSWORTH, Nursing Sister, (Res.), G G. R.N. Hosp. (Peebles), Queen Alexandra's Royal Naval Nursing Service. 29 October 1918. Grave Reference: 1209.


30th

BLAYDON CEMETERY, Durham, UK
BRINTON, Staff Nurse, M G. Territorial Force Nursing Service. 30 October 1918. Grave Reference: M. C. 210.

PITLOCHRY NEW CEMETERY, Perthshire, UK
MACBETH, Staff Nurse, MARGARET ANN, 2/Res/M/1009. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. 30 October 1918. Age 28. Daughter of Mrs. Helen Macbeth, of Lower Viewbank, Pitlochry. Grave Reference: G. 126.

RUSHDEN CEMETERY, Northamptonshire, UK
PRIESTLEY, Worker, ELSIE, 20424. R.E. Special Depot (Haynes Park), Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 30 October 1918. Grave Reference: C. 7. 177.

SUTTON VENY (ST. JOHN) CHURCHYARD, Wiltshire, UK
WALKER, Matron, JEAN MILES. R R C. Australian Army Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 30 October 1918. Age 39. Daughter of Alfred and Louisa Miles Walker, of "Allowah," Dunbarra Rd., Bellevue Hill, Sydney. Born in Tasmania. Grave Reference: 15. H. 1.


UCKFIELD CEMETERY, Sussex, UK
Commonwealth War Dead (1914-1918)
HOWELL, Worker, EMMA, 11077. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 30 October 1918. Age 34. Daughter of Mary E. Howell, of Church Square, Harrogate, Yorks, and the late Richard Howell. Grave Reference: R. 2078.


31st

GRIMSBY (SCARTHO ROAD) CEMETERY, Lincolnshire, UK
DREWRY, Telephonist, HARRIET HAWKESWORTH, G/2335. Women's Royal Naval
Service. 31 October 1918. Age 24. Daughter of Joseph Clifton Drewry and Betsy Drewry, of
49, Farebrother St., Grimsby. (In the same grave is buried: Telephonist Dorothy Marjorie Drewry, G/2091, Women's Royal Naval Service. 25th Feb., 1920. Age 19.). Grave Reference: 38. H. 6.

HASTINGS CEMETERY, SUSSEX, Sussex, UK
HERITAGE, Nurse, AUDREY. Voluntary Aid Detachment. Died of pneumonia, 31
October 1918. Age 17. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Heritage, of The Haven, Sandhurst Lane, Little Common, Bexhill-on-Sea. Grave Reference: L. D. K27.

HORSFORTH CEMETERY, Yorkshire, UK
HOGG, Nurse, FLORENCE. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 31 October 1918. Age 24. Grave Reference: Green 834

READING CEMETERY, Berkshire, UK
CLARK, Member, ELLEN, 19194. No. 3 Stores Depot Park, Women's Royal Air Force. Died of pneumonia, 31 October 1918. Age 35. Daughter of Mrs. Clark, of 9, Mount Pleasant Grove, Reading. Grave Reference: 26. 15098.

Wednesday, 26 September 2018

Two women who served during WW1 who died on 26th September 1918

TWIST, Remembering Nurse, DOROTHY PEARSON TWIST, No. 82/T/118 of The Canadian Military Voluntary Aid Detachment. Nurse Twist died on 26th September 1918 at the age of 29. Her parents were Pearson Gill Twist and his wife, Julia Twist, of Shawnigan Lake, British Columbia, Canada. Nurse Twist was buried in Aldershot Military Cemetery in Hampshire, UK - Grave Reference: AG. 374.   As she is so far from home, I wonder if her grave receives any visitors?

WALKER, Remembering Worker (equal to the rank of Private) WINIFRED LUCY WALKER, No. 13980 who served with The Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps (QMAAC) and was attached to the Royal Engineers in Portsmouth. Winifred died on 26th September 1918 and was buried in Milton Cemetery in Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK - Grave Reference: M. 6. 24.

Saturday, 8 September 2018

Sister E. Salvator of the Nyasaland Nursing Service - 8th September 1918

Sister E. Salvator of The Nyasaland Nursing Service, died on 8th September 1918. Sister Salvator was buried in Mangochi Town Cemetery, Malawi, Africa - Grave Reference: 23.   According to Anne Samson of the Great War in Africa Association, Sister Salvator was a religious Sister of the Society of Mary (Marist Mission ) (Gazette 1917 - https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30305/supplement/9943/data.pdf)
The Montfort Marist Fathers had apparently arrived in Nyasaland in 1901.

With thanks to Anne Samson and photographer Derek Walker for their kind help.  If anyone knows anything about Sister E. Salvator, please get in touch.

I found a family called Salvator from Italy who lived in Glasgow.  The father, Engliano was a stone mason.  They had a daughter, Ernestin, born in France in 1886

Thursday, 6 September 2018

An exhibition commemorating the women of WW1, Rathbone Studio, Birkenhead, Wirral, UK - Heritage Week


A stunning collection of paintings by talented artist Rebecca Grinlay will be on display during Heritage Week 2018 at The Rathbone Studio in Argyle Street, Birkenhead, Wirral, UK. The exhibition is to commemorate the women of WW1.

The Rathbone Studio, 
28 Argyle Street • 
Birkenhead • Wirral • 
CH41 6AE   UK

07903 337 995 • info@rathbonestudio.com

Open Tuesday to Saturday: 2.00pm to 5.00pm
http://www.rathbonestudio.com/

Tuesday, 28 August 2018

Women in the Great War” by Stephen Wynn and Tanya Wynn (Pen & Sword, Barnsley, 2017) - Review

This is an extremely interesting, fast-paced and informative book.  Although I knew quite a lot of the information provided since I began researching for a series of commemorative exhibitions, I also found a good deal that was new to me.   The book begins with an overview of the situation of women – in particular those campaigning to be permitted to vote - during the years leading up to 1914.   Chapter Two is about Munitions Workers with details of dangers involved and the explosions that took place.   Brief mention is also made about the very popular, fund-raising football matches in which the women who worked in factories during WW1 took part.

Chapter Three goes into detail about the history and formation of the Voluntary Aid Detachments and I found this particularly interesting because there is a good deal of confusion these days with the use of the acronym VAD.  Included in that chapter are details of some of the famous women who were VADs .  Chapter Four is devoted to the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) which became the Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps.   Included here is a list of the women of the Corps who died or were killed during WW1.

In Chapter Five, you will find details of other women’s organisations - such as The Women’s Legion, The Territorial Force Nursing Service, The Women’s Hospital Corps, The Women’s Volunteer Reserve, The Women’s Auxiliary Force, The Women’s Land Army, Women Police Force Volunteers, The Women’s Forage Corps, The Women’s Forestry Corps, The Almeric Paget Military Massage Corps, The Women’s Royal Air Force, The Women’s Sick and Wounded Convoy Corps, The Women’s National Land Service Corps and Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service.  Also included in that chapter is the story of Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm who initially went to Belgium with Hector Munro’s Flying Ambulance Unit.

Chapter Six is entitled “Individual Women of the Great War” and has some very interesting stories about women who were secret agents during the conflict.  Chapter Seven lists some of the many women who died or were killed while serving in some capacity during WW1 and Chapter Eight is devoted to the war-time service of Queen Mary and her daughter, Princess Mary.  The book ends with a Conclusion, Acknowledgements and an Index and is beautifully illustrated throughout with photographs and copies of posters, etc.

I was particularly interested in the details of the deal the British Government brokered with the Women’s Social and Policical Union when war broke out (page 4) and a certain incredible fact about DORA that I did not know (page 5).   Information about the involvement of the daughter of Lloyd George was also interestiong (page 28), as I had not heard about her, 

For me the most fascinating story was about the Christmas 1914 gift to serving military personnel known as Princess Mary’s Tin.  My Old Contemptible Grandfather died when I was four years old. When I was growing up, Mother kept his Christmas tin in the kitchen drawer, where it contained pieces of string and sealing wax.  I used to look at the tin and marvel at the names embossed on the lid but it was not until I read this book that I found out about the background to the gift and saw photographs of the contents of the tin (pages 134 – 137).

A most enjoyable book which I would definitely recommend to anyone interested in the role of women during The First World War.

“Women in the Great War” by Stephen Wynn and Tanya Wynn was published by Pen & Sword, Barnsley in 2017.  For further details please see https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/ where you will find details of other fascinating war-related books published by Pen & Sword.

Lucy London, August 2018

Saturday, 18 August 2018

Remembering the women of WW1 who died on 14th August 1918

TERLINCTHUN BRITISH CEMETERY, WIMILLE, Pas de Calais, France

Nurse EDITH INGRAM.  With the 55th Gen. Hospital.  Edith was born in 1887. Her parents were Mr and Mrs S.A. Ingram of Littlehampton. Edith joined the Voluntary Aid Detachment and was posted to France. Edith died on 14 August 1918, at the age of 31. Sh was buried in Terlinchthun British Cemetery, Wimille, Pas de Calais, France. Grave Reference: II. C. 27.   Edith features in a special commemorative book donated to the group Wenches in Trenches The Roses of No Man’s Land “Women Casualties of the Great War in Military Cemeteries – Volume 1:  Belgium & France” where you will find reference to Edith on page 69.

LIVERPOOL (TOXTETH PARK) CEMETERY, Lancashire, United KingdomRemembering Staff

Nurse LILIAN THOMAS, No.  2/Res/T/91 of The Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Lilian Thomas was born in Garston, Liverpool and lived in Toxteth.    Lilian worked at The University War Hospital in Southampton, Hampshire, UK.  Lilian’s parents were William Thomas, born in Seacombe and Emma Thomas, nee Shimmin, born on the Isle of Man.  The family lived in "Carrock," High Bebington Rd., Lower Bebington, Cheshire. Lilian died on 14th August 1918 at the age of 27. She was buried in Toxteth Park Cemetery, Liverpool - Grave Reference: VIII. C.E. 666.
With thanks to Walter Volleamere for additional information about Staff Nurse Thomas.

PORTSMOUTH (HIGHLAND ROAD) CEMETERY, Hampshire, United Kingdom

Charlotte Sophia DUKE, No. G/3028,  was a cook with The Women's Royal Naval Service. Charlotte was born on 22nd July 1895 in Croydon, Surrey. Her parents were Tom and Martha Duke and her siblings were: Sarah, Thomas, Joseph, Elizabeth, Martha and Christine.  Charlotte joined on 17th January 1918 and was at HMS Victory. She worked at the Lion Hotel, Portsmouth (presumably commandeered for war accommodation) from 2nd July 1918.   She died on 14th August 1918 at the age of 23 and was buried in Highland Road Cemetery, Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK. Grave Reference: North Wall. E. 3. 17.

Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Elizabeth Coghill Bartholomew (1894 - 1975) - British VAD


With thanks to Sergio Sbalchiero for sending me this information about VAD Elizabeth Coghill Bartholomew, known as Betty (1894 - 1975), who served on the Italian Front in WW1. 

Elizabeth was born on 23rd May 1894 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Elizabeth's parents were Ian John George Bartholomew, who was cartographer to the King, and his wife, Janet Bartholomew. Elizabeth’s siblings were: 

John (Ian) Bartholomew, an officer in the Gordon Highlanders, who served in France and Flanders, George Hugh Freeland Bartholomew, a Captain with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who was killed in France in October 1917 at the age of 21 and buried in the Rocquigny - Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manancourt, France, Louis St Clair Bartholomew and Margaret (Maisie) Hamilton Bartholomew.

Nicknamed "Betty Bar", Elizabeth joined the 2nd Edinburgh Voluntary Aid Detachment in July 1916 – her address at that time was Gardon, Morton Hall Road, Edinburgh. She worked in Italy with the First British Red Cross Unit from July 1916 to October 1917, at the Hospital of Villa Trento in Dolegnano. Elizabeth was then posted to France, where she worked at No.1 Anglo Belge, Bonsecours, France from June 1918 until April 1919.

After the war, Elizabeth married Henry Pitney van Deusen from Princeton, USA, who went to study theology in Edinburgh. Elizabeth died in Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey, USA on 14th February 1975.

Photos of Betty in Italy and the Hospital Villa Trento, Dolegnano, Italy from Sergio Sbalchiero

Sunday, 12 August 2018

Book Review: "Hattie Big Sky" and "Hattie ever after" by Kirby Larson

My friend Margaret in America sent me a gift of a copy of "Hattie Big Sky" to help with my research into women in the First World War.  I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book, which is inspired by, and based on, the early life of Kirby Larson's Step Great-Grandmother.  Although the work is fiction, Kirby has woven some of Hattie's true story into the work. 

Kirby went to great lengths to research the background of the book, travelling to Montana and talking to relatives of the people who knew Hattie.   The descriptions of how hard life was in remote areas back then give us an insight into what life was like at that time.   There are also stories of how America coped with the war on the home front. We find out what life was like for the 'Doughboys' when Hattie writes to her old school chum, Charlie, who is a soldier with the American Expeditionary Force in France.

I contacted Kirby to tell her how very much I had enjoyed reading "Hattie Big Sky" and she very kindly sent me a copy of the sequel - "Hattie Ever After" - another 'couldn't put it down' book.  This time we follow Hattie to San Francisco, where she finally achieves a long-cherished dream.  The book gives some interesting insights into what life was like for women in the years following WW1 when they had entered the workforce in large numbers.  Many people expected life to return the way it was before 1914.

"Hattie Big Sky" by Kirby Larson, published by Yearling, New York, 2006 and
"Hattie Ever After" by Kirby Larson, published by Delacorte Press, New York, 2013.

For further information, please see http://www.hattiebigsky.com/
and http://www.kirbylarson.com/hattie-ever-after/



Friday, 3 August 2018

VIOLET ALICE LAMBTON. LONG, O B E.

Remembering VIOLET ALICE LAMBTON. LONG, O B E., Chief Controller of The Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps who was drowned at sea when the Hospital Ship HMHS "Warilda" sank on 3rd August 1918.

His Majesty's Australian Transport “Warilda” was built by William Beardmore and Company in Glasgow as the SS “Warilda” for the Adelaide Steamship Company.  She was designed for the East-West Australian coastal service, but following the start of the First World War, was converted into a troopship and later, in 1916, into a hospital ship.

On 3rd August 1918, HMHS “Warilda” was taking wounded soldiers from Le Havre, France to Southampton when she was torpedoed by the German submarine UC-49. The ship was marked clearly with the Red Cross. Germany justified this action by maintaining the ships were also carrying weapons – though in this case it would surely have been travelling in the wrong direction to transport arms.

The ship sank in about two hours, and of the 801 persons on board, 123 died. The wreck is in the English Channel.

Photographs from the collection held for the nation by the Imperial War Museum in London.  Name of photographer unknown.

HOLLYBROOK MEMORIAL, SOUTHAMPTON, Hampshire, United Kingdom
LONG, Chief Controller, VIOLET ALICE LAMBTON. O B E. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Drowned at sea (from HMHS "Warilda"), 3 August 1918. 

With many thanks to Debbie Cameron and Mark Bristow for the following information about Violet:

Violet Beatrix Alice Lambton Long nee Way, O.B.E. was born in Gosford, Northumberland on 30th April 1883, the daughter of Col. Wilfred FitzAlan Way and Henrietta Mary Way, nee Ross.  Violet’s sister, Florence Edith Victoria Leach, nee Way, who also served in the QMAAC, was born in Jersey in 1874.  Her other siblings were Ethel E.H Way, born 1877, Wilfred G.M Way, born 1878.
In 1881 her father (who was born at Long Ashton) was at Ashton Court in Somerset with his cousin Baronet John G. Smith (family known later as Smyth). Ashton Court by the way was used as an Officers Hospital during WW1.

At time of 1901 census she was residing at Portsmouth with her father, 55 year old retired Infantry Colonel Wilfred Way. She was born in Northumberland at time he was a Captain with 5th Fusiliers.
Violet married William Edward Long in 1901. Violet and William had two daughters, Felicity Annette Cynthia Long and Violet Long.

Major W.E.Long, O.B.E.(son of Colonel W. Long, C.M.G.) was a Captain in the Remount Service/4th Hussars, and they lived at Newton House, Hill Road, Clevedon.
(Clevedon Town Council took over from Clevedon Urban District Council for whom Colonel Long was Chairman from 1908 - 1923.)

According to the "Chiswick Times" Violet lived at 4, Abinger Road, Bedford Park with her husband and two daughters. The vicar of her local church, where her name is listed on the WW1 memorial, said that "Mrs Violet Long was a splendid speciman of womanhood." She helped with the training of a large number of candidates in the Parish Hall for the examination by the St John Ambulance Society.

The vicar also said " It is well for us to remember the heroic part women have played in this war, and the especial worthiness of Mrs. Long in particular, who lived among us."
"Violet Long was responsible for the cookery and domestic section of the Women's Legion. When the Women's Legion amalgamated with the WAACs Mrs. Long brought over 3,000 recruits."
"Mrs Long was a very handsome woman with a magnificent head of bright brown hair."

The newspaper report also explains that Major William Long, Violet's husband, was in Egypt at the time doing remount work.

The following account of the sinking is by Miss Charlotte Allen Trowell QMAAC the only survivor of two members of the Corps who were aboard HMHS “Warilda”:

"I was acting as orderly to Mrs. Long, Deputy Chief Controller of the QMAAC. There was no warning of impending disaster when I retired to my bunk at a quarter to twelve. Mrs Long came to my bunk just before retiring herself and inquired, "Are you comfy?" and gave me some chocolates.

When the torpedo struck the vessel I was thrown out of my bunk. I hurried on deck, and just as I got up there the stairway was blown up.

There was no panic. Those wounded boys although dying, were splendid. I was put into a boat filled with wounded, but as the vessel sank our boat was not level. A davit rope was cut, but the boat capsized and we were thrown into the water. I clung to a rope and a wounded American Officer and an Australian pulled me into another boat. The wounded soldiers who were in that boat insisted on wrapping their saturated blankets around me.

I shall never forget the end of Mrs. Long who had been so kind to me. She clung to the boat into which I had been dragged and I caught hold of her by the hair. She exclaimed "Oh save me. My feet are fastened. I have lost a foot." Her feet had become entangled in some rope.

Strenuous efforts succeeded in freeing her limbs and a Southampton sailor tried hard to get her into the boat, but she collapsed suddenly, fell back and was drowned.

We were about two hours in the boat before we were picked up. "


Wednesday, 25 July 2018

Book Review “The War Nurses” by Lizzie Page (Bookouture, an imprint of StoryFire Ltd., London, 2018)

"The War Nurses" is a fictional story based loosely on the activities of Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm, who nursed the wounded in Flanders during the First World War.

Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm were among the first women involved in the First World War that I researched for a commemorative exhibition about some of the amazing ‘Inspirational Women’ of WW1, so I was really pleased when Lizzie asked me to review her book about the ‘Angels of Pervyse’.  Apart from Pat Barker’s “Regeneration Trilogy”, “Warhorse” and “Birdsong”, I have not read a novel about WW1 for the past six years, as I have been reading factual accounts for research purposes.   This novel is therefore a welcome change for me. 

It is very difficult for people these days to imagine what life must have been like in 1914, when none of those things we all rely on existed: no Internet, social media, mobile phones, television, radio, air travel, holidays abroad, etc.  Ordinary folk did not have a telephone at home and newspapers and telegrammes were the main means of spreading news.  Many people never ventured outside their own village – the First World War changed all that.

“The War Nurses” is a work of fiction but Lizzie weaves an amazing and fascinating story, re-imagining what life must have been like for the two women. Lizzie puts herself in Mairi’s shoes, with inspiration from the true story of the four years the two women spent on the Western Front looking after the wounded.  Lizzie has obviously put her heart and soul into this book, to which she brings a very modern approach which, hopefully, will appeal to younger readers and spread the word at long last about all of the incredible women and their extensive involvement in The First World War.

A fascinating read.

Lucy London
www.inspirationalwomenofww1.blogspot.co.uk
July 2018

Jennie Jackson ("Young Kitchener") - a young girl from Lancashire who raised money for the fighting men during WW1

While I was researching a WW1 poet yesterday, I came across a reference to some poems about a young girl from Burnley, Lancashire, UK.  Jane, known as ‘Jennie’, Jackson, was also known as "Young Kitchener" for the work she did during the First World War collecting money to fund parcels for the fighting men.

Jennie Jackson was born on 27th December 1907.  Her parents were John and Kate Jackson and she had three brothers, all of whom served during WW1. William, the eldest, enlisted in the 3rd (Prince of Wales) Dragoon Guards on 31st October 1914.  Shortly afterwards, on 21st November 1914, Richard, the third son, volunteered to serve with the Shropshire Light Infantry.  John Samuel, the second son, joined the Royal Field Artillery on 29th October 1915.

If ever we needed proof that the First World War involved every man, woman and child in Britain, here it is.

The poems were written by Thomas Napoleon Smith, pen-name Tonosa. They were:  "Burnley's war flame (Jennie JACKSON), alias Y.K." and "Burnley's winning Jennie (Jennie Jackson)".

Thomas's son, Corporal Ewart G. Smith of the 2nd Infantry Brigade, Canadian Expeditionary Force, was killed in a trench on 27th September 1916.

My thanks to Andrew Mackay for sending me his photographs and information about Jennie. http://www.lancashire.gov.uk/ww1/blog/young-kitchener/ 

Find out more on Andrew's website: http://www.burnleyinthegreatwar.info/

The Photographs have been kindly supplied by Andrew Mackay from his private collection. 

Thank you Andrew.

An exhibition about poetry written by schoolchildren during the First World War is on display at The Wilfred Owen Story, Argyle Street, Birkenhead, Wirral, UK.

http://www.wilfredowenstory.com/



Friday, 13 July 2018

A wonderful tribute to Worker Mary 'May' Wylie of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps who died while serving in WW1

In an effort to persuade someone to visit the grave of Worker (equivalent to the male rank of Private) Mary 'May' Wylie of the QMAAC, who died on 9th July 1918 and was buried in Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool, UK, I wrote a letter to the "Liverpool Echo" who were kind enough to print the letter.


Here is what happened next: The Liverpool Scottish Association sent a message to my friend Sue Robinson of the group Wenches in Trenches The Roses of No Man's Land, saying: The Association was alerted by a recent letter to the 'Liverpool Echo' that today, 9th July 2018, was going to be the Centenary of the death in Oswestry of Worker Mary 'May' Wylie of Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps where she was serving on attachment to 3/10th (Scottish) Bn, Kings (Liverpool) Regiment.


She is buried in Anfield Cemetery. Consequently I conducted a short memorial service at the graveside and Kenny Whittaker played a lament. In July 1918 the Bootle Times noted that ".... May Wylie died for her country as surely as the gallant soldiers who fall in battle". A full report will appear in this Winter's newsletter. From the Liverpool Scottish Association via Sue Robinson.


My grateful thanks to "The Liverpool Echo", the Liverpool Scottish Association and Sue Robinson. Together "We will remember them" ALL.

Tuesday, 10 July 2018

Mrs Hilda Wynne (1884 - 1923) - British

Newspapers at the time of WW1 report that Hilda was ‘… probably the most decorated British woman of the First World War’.

Hilda was born in 1884 but I have been unable to find out more about her early life. According to the Peerage website, Hilda’s father was James Clifton Brown born in 1841 and a Colonel in the British Army. He was from Yorkshire and served as a Justice of the Peace (JP) in Essex, UK.  Hilda's mother was Amelia Wroe, who was apparently American. The Clifton Browns had ten children – Elsie, Howard, Edward, Louisa, Francis (who became a Vice Admiral), Mildred, Leonard, Douglas (who became a Colonel), Isla and Cedric who was born in 1887.

I can’t seem to find a Hilda and the marriages the four Clifton Brown girls made were not to anyone called Wynne. I found a Reginald Wynne who married a Hilda Brown in 1902, St. George’s Hannover Square, London. He died in Paris in 1913 and was a Colonel in the British Army who fought in the Boer War, which would tally with Hilda being a widow in 1917 when she went to visit America to raise funds to take an ambulance unit to Russia.

I read in one newspaper report about Hilda that her husband had been ‘a general’. According to the Red Cross website, a meeting was held at the Royal Automobile Club in London in September 1914, asking members to lend their vehicles for service as ambulances. Hilda and a man called Ivor Bevan (about whom I can find nothing!) formed the Bevan-Wynne Ambulance Unit and Hilda drove several of the vehicles to Belgium herself. She was based in Dixmunde, where she met up with Dr. Hector Monro and Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm, who also took a mobile ambulance unit to Belgium and France in 1914.

There is a mention of Hilda in Sarah Macnaughtan’s book about her war on two continents. And a photograph of Hilda was featured on the front cover of “The Sketch” on 2nd September 1915, with this report:

"Hilda Wynne in the trenches in the Western Front After service in Belgium, France and Italy, in 1917 Hilda went to America and raised funds for the Anglo Russian Bevan Ambulance Cars Unit."

At that time Hilda was living in West Chapel Street in Mayfair, London. She served in Russia until 1919 and was awarded the Kuaatan Order of St. George for her work with Russian Guards on the Kovel Front.

Hilda died penniless in Paris on 28th January 1923, having spent all her money on looking after the wounded.

Sources: http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/albert-bushnell-hart/harpers-pictorial-library-of-the-world-war--volume-7-tra/page-11-harpers-pictorial-library-of-the-world-war--volume7-tra.shtml Award from Russia http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/22343113/2539987 and photograph from "The Sketch" newspaper of 2nd September 1915.

I am very grateful indeed to Sergio Sbalchiero for additional information about Hilda' and her war-time service:

"At the beginning of the war Hilda Wynne enlisted in the Hector Munro's Ambulance Corps operating on the Flanders front. There she met another volunteer, the Scottish banker Ivor Bevan. Together, they founded the Wynne Bevan Ambulance Corps. They operated on the Russian front from 1915 to 1917 in Galicia, Persia and Caucaso. In october 1917 they went to Italy and settled in Preganziol, a little town near Treviso, transporting the wounded on the Piave front. In june 1918, during the last Austrian offensive, they transported 840 Italian wounded. After the battle Hilda received a silver medal for valour and a cross of war. In Flanders she had been decorated with the Order of Leopoldo II and the Croix de Guerre. In Russia she received twice medals of the Order of St. George from the Tsar. She received also a medal of the Red Cross. An Italian officer said that she was 'a worthy follower of Florence Nightingale'."

My thanks also to Lynne Sidaway who tells me that Hilda's son was still alive aged 91 in 1995, living in Tennessee, America.

Friday, 6 July 2018

Some of the women who died or were killed during the First World War in July 1918

 July 1918

1st

MANCHESTER (GORTON) CEMETERY, Lancashire, UK

SMITH, Staff Nurse, F. E. SMITH, No. 2/ResS/1235. Staff Nurse Smith worked at the Military Hospital in Aylesbury, UK during WW1. She served with the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service and died on 1st July 1918.  Staff Nurse Smith was buried in Gorton Cemetery, Manchester, Grave Reference: P. C.E. 140.

3rd

MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA, Greece
MacDOWELL, Chauffeuse, MATILDA with theScottish Women's Hospital. Matilda died on 3rd July 1918 and was buried in Mikra British Cemetery, Kalamaria, Greece, Grave Reference: 1553.


BASRA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq   
KEMP, Staff Nurse, C. M. F. Kemp of the 40th British General Hospital. Staff Nurse Kemp was a member of the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. She died on 4th July 1918 and was buried in Basra War Cemetery in Mesopotamia (now in Iraq) - Grave Reference: III. T. 2.

6th
EDINBURGH (ROSEBANK) CEMETERY, Edinburgh, UK
ELDER, Telephonist, ELIZABETH GRANT ELDER, No. G/2605 with the Women's Royal Naval Service. Elizabeth died on 6th July 1918 and was buried in Rosebank Cemetery, Edinburgh, UK - Grave Reference: K. 207.

7th
CANTERBURY CEMETERY, KENT, Kent, UK
MOSS, Driver, R M. MOSS, of the Women's Legion, attached to the Army Service Corps. Driver Moss died on 7th July 1918 and was buried in Canterbury Cemetery, Kent, UK - Grave Reference: R. 351.

LAMBETH CEMETERY, London, UK
EVANS, Member, NELLIE, 12410 of the Women's Royal Air Force. Nellie died of sickness on 7th  July 1918 at the age of 23.  Nellie was married to A. W. Evans, of Courtney Road., Drayton Park, Holloway, London. Grave Reference: Screen Wall. H.3. 859.

9th
LIVERPOOL (ANFIELD) CEMETERY, Lancashire, UK

Worker (which is equivalent to the male rank of Private) May (Mary) Wylie, No. 6306 of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps, was attached to the 10th Reserve Battalion of The King's (Liverpool Scottish Regiment). May was born in 1898 in Bootle. Her parents were Hugh Wylie and his wife Emily Mary Wylie, nee Hodgson of Stanley Rd., Bootle.  May had the following siblings:  Harold, Margaret, Rose and Allan.    May died on 9th July 1918 at at Oswestry Military Hospital at the age of 20.  May’s body was returned home for her funeral and she was buried with full military honours in Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool - Grave Reference: I. U. 786.  May is also remembered on Bootle Civic Memorials in Linacre Council School and Liverpool (Anfield) Cemetery



10th
FRENSHAM (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD, Surrey, UK
STEWART, Staff Nurse, WILMA BRIDGES of the Territorial Force Nursing Service. Wilma died of phthisis on 10th July 1918. Her parents were Charles W. and Sarah Bridges Stewart, of Pembroke Crescent, Hove, Sussex. Grave Reference: On West boundary.

12th
BUXTON CEMETERY, Derbyshire, UK
ROSS, Nursing Sister, ADA JANET of the 1st Gen. Hosp., Canadian Army Medical Corps. Ada died on 12th  July 1918, at the age of 50. Grave Reference: 2479.

13th

ALVIE PARISH CHURCHYARD, Inverness-shire, UK

GRANT, Worker, JESSIE, 21527. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Died of pneumonia, 13 July 1918. Age 25. Daughter of George and Bella Grant, of Rest Cottage, Kincraig. Grave Reference: In South-East corner.


15th
FOREST TOWN (ST. ALBAN) CHURCHYARD, Nottinghamshire, UK

YOUNG, Nurse, ADA ELIZABETH. Voluntary Aid Detachment. 15 July 1918. Age 33.
Daughter of the late Serjt. Maj. Young (5th Dragoon Guards) and Mrs. Young, of Dublin. 

16th
WOOLWICH CEMETERY, London, UK
DAW, Worker, WINIFRED, 7319. M.T. Depot (Sydenham), Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 16 July 1918. Grave Reference: 11. 278

17th
LEATHERHEAD (SS. MARY AND NICHOLAS) CHURCHYARD, Surrey, UK
WELLER, Worker, ADA ELIZABETH, 39645. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 17 July 1918. Grave Reference: In East part.

21st
STE. MARIE CEMETERY, LE HAVRE, Seine-Maritime, France
ASPDEN, Worker, DOROTHY, 30438. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 21 July 1918. Grave Reference: Div. 62. III. N. 6.

22nd

BROOKWOOD CEMETERY, Surrey, UK
HILLS, Sister, MAUDE ELLEN. Territorial Force Nursing Service. Died of sickness, 22 July 1918. Age 43. Daughter of Edwin and Sarah Broadhurst Hills, of Cranbrook, Kent. Served in France. Grave Reference: H. 181321.

23rd

MORTON (THORNHILL) CEMETERY, Dumfriesshire, UK
HASTINGS, Sister, H M. Territorial Force Nursing Service. 23 July 1918. Grave Reference: G2. 12.

30th
TERLINCTHUN BRITISH CEMETERY, WIMILLE, Pas de Calais, France
YOUNG, Nurse, MARGARET CAMERON. 2nd Gen. Hosp., Voluntary Aid Detachment. Died of disease, 30 July 1918. Age 25. Daughter of Amelia and the late Thomas Young, of 37, Newington Avenue, Belfast. Grave Reference: I. F. 44.  See photo from Callan Chevin’s Fb page.


SWANMORE (ST. BARNABAS) CHURCHYARD, Hampshire, UK
HORNER, Worker, VIOLET MAY, 45051. Hostel (Bristol), Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 30 July 1918. Grave Reference: North-East of church.

Wednesday, 4 July 2018

Nursing Sister Mary Rodwell, QAIMNS

Sarah Reay, author of the fantastic book “The Half-Shilling Curate, A personal account of war & faith 1914-1918”, about her grandfather, Army Chaplain The Reverend Herbert Cowl, has given me permission to share this beautiful photograph of Sister Mary Rodwell with you.  The photograph from the author's own collection, is to be found on page 175 of the book.

Nursing Sister Mary Rodwell was the nurse attending Herbert when he was allowed to return to Britain for treatment after being seriously wounded  by a shell fragment.  They were aboard British Hospital Ship "Anglia", which hit a mine and sank while returning to Britain with wounded soldiers from the Western Front on 17th November 1915.

Mary Rodwell was born in Brockdish, Norfolk, UK (near Diss) on 7th June 1874. Her parents were John and Emma Rodwell, she later lived in the village of Oakley on the Norfolk/Suffolk border.

Mary trained as a nurse at Hendon Infirmary in North West London from 1901 to 1904.  She went on to work at the Samaritan Free Hospital, Marylebone Road, London, after which she worked as a private nurse. Mary was a member of the Crystal Palace and Anerley Women's Freedom League (WFL).

When war broke out, Mary felt it was her duty to volunteer for foreign service. From February to May 1915, she served on hospital trains, before being posted to the Hospital Ship "Anglia".  Mary was the only nurse on the ship who died when "Anglia" hit a mine and sank on 17th November 1915.

Sarah explains:

"Mary was amongst the nursing staff on board who attended to King George V on his return from France in October 1915, when he had been injured in a riding accident" while visiting the troops on the Western Front." (p.175).

Mary has no grave but is commemorated on the Hollybrook Memorial in Southampton, UK, on the QAIMNS memorial in York Minster, the memorial board in St. Paul's Anerly, near Penge, at Ditchingham Parish Church, Norfolk, at All Saints Church, Plumpton Green, near Lewes, Sussex, and on a plaque honouring 500 nurses who lost their lives in WW1 in Edinburgh Central Library.  On 2nd July 1920 a memorial bronze plaque was unveiled at Colindale hospital.

Here is the link to the book’s website: www.halfshillingcurate.com

Sources:  http://cohse-union.blogspot.com/2009/11/mary-rodwell-suffragette-and-ww1.html
and Sarah Reay, “The Half-Shilling Curate, A personal account of war & faith 1914-1918” (Helion & Co. Ltd., Solihull, West Midlanbds, UK, 2018)

The photograph, from Sarah Reay's private collection, is reproduced in "The Half Shilling Curate" on page 175. 

Remembering Staff Nurse, C. M. F. Kemp, QAIMNS

Remembering Staff Nurse, C. M. F. Kemp of the 40th British General Hospital in Mesopotamia during WW1. Staff Nurse Kemp was a member of the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. She died on 4th July 1918 and was buried in Basra War Cemetery in Mesopotamia (now in Iraq) - Grave Reference: III. T. 2.

Sunday, 1 July 2018

Remembering Staff Nurse F.E. Smith of the QAIMNS

Staff Nurse, F. E. SMITH, No. 2/ResS/1235. Staff Nurse Smith worked at the Military Hospital in Aylesbury, UK during WW1. She served with the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service and died on 1st July 1918.  Staff Nurse Smith was buried in Gorton Cemetery, Manchester, Grave Reference: P. C.E. 140.

Book Review by Historian Debbie Cameron: “British Widows of the First World War: The Forgotten Legion” by Andrea Hetherington

Debbie Cameron has written a review of the book “British Widows of the First World War:  The Forgotten Legion” by Andrea Hetherington, published by Pen & Sword Military, Barnsley, Yorkshire, UK, 2018 - ISBN: 9781473886766

“This book is packed with info about various committees, social history and personal stories to tempt a researcher. The first one I followed up was tragic. Sybil Griffin, widowed aged 18, shot herself 6/11/17. Her mother found her, her last words being “I have done for myself. I am going to Cecil” Her suicide note said her World was empty. But ended “… cheer up, your loving daughter”. I’ve found her husband’s RFC record card and researched him. He died in an aircraft accident in October 1917 aged just 23. Capt Griffiths died in a flying accident in Kenley UK. He initially survived but died of wounds. The aircraft is noted as being a ‘right (sic) off’. They were married for less than a year by special licence as she was just 17. Tragic.”

Historian Debbie Cameron runs an excellent Facebook Page called 'Remembering Women on the Home Front WW1' which you can find via this link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1468972083412699/  Debbie also contributes a great deal of material to the Imperial War Museum's Lives of the First World War Digital Memory Project: https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/

For further details about fantastic Pen and Sword military history books, please see their website https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/




Saturday, 23 June 2018

Staff Nurse Ruby Dickinson, Australian Army Nursing Service, died on 23rd June 1918

Remembering Staff Nurse, RUBY DICKINSON of the Australian Army Nursing Service. Ruby, who was born in Forbes, New South Wales, Australia, died on 23rd June 1918 at the age of 32. Daughter of William and Julia Dickinson, of "Arizona," Almora St., Mosman, Queensland.   Ruby was buried in the Churchyard of St. Mary’s Church, Harefield, Middlesex, UK - Grave Reference: Aust. 57.

Tuesday, 12 June 2018

Book Review: “Sister Poppy at the Front” by Brenda Gostling and Mik Richardson (Brenda Gostling, Norwich, 2018)

To my mind, this is a very important book.  Inspired by Poppy the GoGo Hare, a commemorative sculpture in Norfolk, and by the letters of the veteran war nurse Kate Luard, “Sister Poppy at the Front” tells the story of a member of Britain’s Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Nursing Service who served in France during the First World War. With the title character being depicted as a hare, the book is primarily aimed at small children. However,  adults will also enjoy reading the nurse’s story, which is complemented by some really beautiful drawings - reminiscent of the “Little Grey Rabbit” series.

I love the simplicity of the story told about the nurse, her duties in France, the conditions in which she worked and how she felt.   Finding her brother is the sort of coincidence that did happen. Brenda includes brief details of a Base Hospital, a Casualty Clearing Station and a Hospital Train. The illustrations really help to set the scene.   I particularly liked the illustration of Poppy’s QAIMNS tippet hanging in the cupboard on the first page and are they badgers who are stretcher bearers?

Reading the book took me back to my own primary school days when our headmistress often read us stories about a resourceful rabbit, and to my earliest introduction to the history of the First World War.  I vividly remember, as a very young child, looking at Grandfather’s black and white framed print of Fortunino Matania’s “Goodbye Old Man” and wondering what happened to the horse.  To my mind, it is vital to educate young children about our history and to ensure individual stories are recorded.  It is also good to find a book that describes the women of WW1 who contributed so much but who have been overlooked for so long.  My family always commemorated the First World War but it was not until I began researching in 2012 for a series of commemorative exhibitions about the conflict, that I realised the full involvement of women.

A share of any profits from the sale of “Sister Poppy at the Front” will go to the East Anglian charity Break, which runs children’s homes and also provides breaks for children and young people with disabilities and their families.

Some time ago, I heard of an initiative in Australia whereby people sponsor small teddy bears dressed in WW1 military uniforms, which are sent to primary schools to help educate children about Australia’s involvement in the conflict. Brenda tells me that a Norwich firm of Independent Financial Advisers – Almary Green - who were the sponsors of the Poppy GoGoHare sculpture - have kindly purchased a copy of the book for every primary school in the county of Norfolk – a total of 355 books.  Definitely an initiative to copy.

“Sister Poppy at the Front” £6.99, written and published by Brenda Gostling with illustrations by Mik Richardson.  Further details from http://www.brendagostling.co.uk/

Note:  The QARANC (as the QAIMNS has become) explain: “Brenda and Mik have amalgamated the uniforms of the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service and the Voluntary Aid Detachment to form the uniform as worn by Sister Poppy who nurses on a ward at No. 33 Casualty Clearing Station.”
http://www.qaranc.co.uk/Sister-Poppy-at-the-Front-GoGoHare.php

Photos: Brenda and Mik with the book and a cuddly hare in a nurse's uniform made by Mik's wife to accompany Brenda and  Mik on promotional visits.

Lucy London, 12th June 2018

Monday, 4 June 2018

Eleanor Eileen Black, VAD and Dorothea Kathleen Mary Bolus, South African VAD, who drowned on 4th June 1918

4th June 1918

Remembering Volunteer ELEANOR EILEEN. BLACK, a volunteer with the Voluntary Aid Detachment who drowned at sea from Royal Mail Ship RMS “Kenilworth Castle” on 4th June 1918. Eleanor was daughter of Randlord Black, of Queen's Road, Parktown, Johannesburg. Eleanor is remembered in York Minster, York, UK on the Panel commemorating the South Africa Army Nursing Service and on Hollybrook Memorial in Southampton, Hampshire, UK. 

Remembering Volunteer DOROTHEA KATHLEEN MARY BOLUS of the South African Voluntary Aid Detachment, a passenger on the RMS “Kenilworth Castle”, who drowned on 4th  June 1918. Dorothea was daughter of Mrs. Louise Bolus, of "Maisonnette," Kenilworth, Cape Town, South Africa. Dorothea was buried in Plymouth’s Efford Cemetery, in Devonshire, UK - Grave Reference: Church. C. 4785.

The Royal Mail Ship “Kenilworth Castle” was one of the first mail ships commissioned for the Union-Castle Shipping Line.  Built at Harland and Wolfe, Belfast in 1903, she was launched in 1904 and requisitioned as a troop carrier during the First World War. The ship was in a convoy sailing to Britain. It was dark and they had to sail without lights to avoid detection by German submarines.  35 miles off Portsmouth, two of the Royal Navy escort ships were in collision - HMS “Rival” and HMS “Kent”.  Depth chargers from “Rival” exploded under the “Kenilworth Castle”, which was badly damaged. The order was given to abandon ship.  Some of the life boats were lowered but became swamped and 15 people were drowned, among them Eleanor Black and Dorothea Bolus.    The RMS “Kenilworth Castle” eventually reached Portsmouth, where the remainder of her passengers were put ashore.  The ship was repaired, went to sea again after the war and was broken up in 1936.

Here is an extract from a letter from Nurse Bracken, one of the nurses who survived in which she described the incident:   “I'm sending you one of our newspaper accounts of the affair because it describes what happened to the lifeboat in which Black, Bolus, a Wynberg girl called Zondendyk, and myself were.   When the boat capsized I managed to hang on to the side and hung and hung until the boat righted itself but it was the most ghastly few minutes I ever lived through. I remember a big dark wave washing right over me and something - an oar, I think, pressed against my throat until I thought I should choke and something else crushed my eye against the boat's edge and I saw stars and felt my eyeball must burst. My corsets were torn right off me and my legs were bruised and bleeding. Then the boat righted itself and I found myself inside. There were just two of us left, the other a fellow passenger named Dawson and his pyjamas were simply tom to rags! Our boat was quite full of water and we had lost our oars and rudder.

We didn't see or hear anything of the others then and were drifting right away until the Kenilworth turned and her wash brought us rushing back. I really thought that was the very end but we did a surprising turn and instead of crashing into her we rushed along her side and crossed her stern so close that Mr Dawson was struck in the mouth and his teeth knocked out. Then we got out on the other side and that was the last we saw of the Kenilworth. It was horribly dark and we could hear the dreadful calls for help from men and women in the water but could not get near to them. Two women drifted right up to the boat and these were saved. One was the young wife of a Colonel of Marines - the other Nurse Zondendyk. I found a bucket and a scoop tied to the boat and these were used to bale out the water. Mr Dawson and I baled and baled until we were too tired to do any more but the boat felt almost respectable again so we all sat huddled together shivering and taking turns at being sea sick!” 

Read more from Nurse ‘s letter here:  http://samilitaryhistory.org/vol054kc.html

Original Source:  Commonwealth War Graves Commission List of Female Casualties of the First World War

Additional information kindly supplied by Derek Walker : http://www.southafricawargraves.org/search/details.php?id=1862