Thursday, 31 May 2018

Some of the women of WW1 who died or were killed during May 1918

May 1918

1st May

BLETCHLEY CEMETERY, Buckinghamshire, UK

SAUNDERS, Worker, (Assistant Cook), LILIAN. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 1 May 1918. Age 25. Daughter of Mr and Mrs J Saunders, of Fenny Stratford. Grave Reference: Spec. Memorial.

5th May

WARNOCK, Nurse, ELIZABETH McMATH (DAISY). 10th (Glasgow) Detachment attd. 8th General Hospital, Voluntary Aid Detachment. Died of septicaemia, 5th May 1918. Age 31. Daughter of William and Mary Malcolm Elizabeth Muir Warnock, of 19, Westminster Terrace, Glasgow, late of Holytown, Lanarkshire. Buried St. Sever Cemetery, France, Grave Reference: Officers, B. 4. 23.

7th May

STREATHAM CEMETERY, London, United Kingdom

LATHAM, Forewoman, LOUISA FRANCES, 37124. Depot, Tank Corps (Wareham), Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Died of sickness, 7 May 1918. Age 39. Daughter of George and Catherine Latham, of

10th May

BASRA MEMORIAL, Iraq

HOBBES, Sister, NARRELLE. Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. Buried at sea, 10 May 1918. Age 37. Daughter of the late J.F. and Margaret Hobbes of New South Wales, Australia. Grave Reference: Panel 43.

12th May

BIRMINGHAM (LODGE HILL) CEMETERY, Warwickshire, UK

Staff Nurse, BEATRICE GEORGINA FREDERICA FORBES of the Territorial Force Nursing Service, who died on 12th May 1918. Beatrice was buried in Birmingham Lodge Hill Cemetery in Warwickshire, UK - Grave Reference: Screen Wall. B10. 2. 225.

16th May

MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA, Greece

Staff Nurse, MARGARET ELLISON DUCKERS of the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service, who died on 16th May 1918 at the age of 25. Margaret’s parents were James Samuel and Jane Duckers, of "Edencroft," Wetheral, Carlisle. She was buried in Mikra British Cemetery, in Kalamaria, Greece - Grave Reference: 254.

17th May

EDINBURGH (WARRISTON) CEMETERY, Edinburgh, UK

Remembering Assistant Administrator (equivalent to the male rank of Officer) MARJORIE TRAILL MARTIN, Service No. O/1144,  of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps, who died on 17th May 1918 at the age of 26.  Marjorie’s parents were the Rev. Alexander Martin, D.D. (Professor of Theology and Principal of New College, Edinburgh), and Jane Thorburn Martin. Marjorie was buried in Warriston Cemetery, Edinburgh - Grave Reference: K. 150.

19th May

ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

MACDONALD, Nursing Sister, KATHERINE MAUDE MARY MACDONALD of the 1st Canadian Gen.eral Hospital.  Katherine was with the Canadian Army Nursing Service. She was killed in action on 19th  May 1918 at the age of 31. Her parents were Mary Maud and Angus Macdonald, of Brantford, Ontario, Canada.  Katherine was buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, where you will find 19 other women who died in WW1.  Katherine’s Grave Reference for anyone visiting Etaples Military Cemetery is XXVIII. L. 8.

20th May 1918

ST. ARILDA'S CHURCHYARD, Oldbury, Gloucestershire, UK

Phoebe Elizabeth MEADOWS, a VAD with the Territorial Force Nursing Service.  Born 1889 died 20th May 1918. Phoebe’s parents were Charles and Phoebe Elizabeth Meadows. She was buried in St Arilda's Churchyard, Oldbury, Gloucestershire. Grave reference:B14.

21st May

ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

Nursing Sister, GLADYS MAUDE MARY WAKE of the 1st Canadian General Hospital. Gladys was with the Canadian Army Nursing Service. She died of wounds received during an airraid by enemy aircraft on 21st May 1918 at the age of 34.  Gladys’s parents were Gervas Fountayne Wake and Amy Rosamond Wake, of Compton Hill, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK. Gladys was born in Esqlaimault, British Columbia, Canada.  She was buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France , where you will find 19 other women who died or were killed during the First World War.  The Grave Reference for Gladys Maude Mary Wake is  XXVIII. L. 5.

23rd May

TRURO CEMETERY, NOVA SCOTIA, Nova Scotia, Canada
Remembering Nursing Sister, JESSIE  A. JARVIS of the Canadian Army Medical Corps. Jessie died of pneumonia on 23rd May 1918 at the age of 29.  Her parents were George M Jarvis and Frances M. Jarvis, of 176, Bolsford St., Moncton, New Brunswick.  Jessie was buried in Truro Cemetery, Nova Scotia, Canada.   Grave Reference: L. 50. Div. C. Third grave from North end.   I wonder if her grave receives any visitors?

24th May

RAWALPINDI WAR CEMETERY, Pakistan

Remembering Nurse RUTH MARY NODDER of the Territorial Force Nursing Service. Ruth died of sickness on 24th May 1918, at the age of 33.  Her parents were the Rev. J. B. Nodder and Mrs. Nodder, of Ashover Rectory, Chesterfield, Derbyshire.    Ruth was buried in Rawalpindi War Cemetery, which is in Pakistan. Grave Reference: 3. A. 6.  I wonder if her grave receives any visitors?

26th May

ASH CEMETERY, Surrey, United Kingdom

Remembering Mechanic Driver, Florence EMBLETON of the Women's Legion, who died on 26th May 1918.  Florence was born in Yorkshire in 1888. Her parents were John Embleton, a Captain in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps,and his wife, Sarah Embleton.  Florence had a brother Charles, b. 1891 in Egypt where his father was based at the time, and John, born in 1896.  Charles also joined the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, served in France during WW1 and died on 20th July 1916.  Florence and her family lived in York in 1901 and in Ash, Surrey, at the time of her death.  During WW1 Florence initially served as a clerk and then nursed in Aldershot Hospital.  Florence joined the Women’s League in 1917 and was a Motor Driver with No. 52 Motor Transport Corps, Army Service Corps, attached to the Army School of Sanitation.   She was buried with full military honours in Ash Cemetery, Ash, Surrey, UK, Grave Reference: F. 15-1.   Source:  CWGC List of Female Casualties of the First World War and http://www.ashmuseum.org.uk/embleton.htm


28th May

ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

Remembering Nursing Sister Margaret LOWE of the 1st Canadian Gen. Hosp., Canadian Army Nursing Service. Margaret was badly injured a German air raid on Etaples and died on 28th May 1918 at the age of 32.  Her father was Thomas Lowe, of Binscarth, Manitoba, Canada.  Margaret was buried with full military honours in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. Grave Reference: XXVIII. M. 9.

29th – 30th May 1918

The night of 29th - 30th May 1918 was particularly bad, as there were several German bombing raids on non-military targets such as hospitals.  In spite of the hospitals being clearly marked with Red Crosses and situated some way away from the Front, they were still bombed by enemy aircraft. The diary of No.3 Canadian Stationary Hospital records:  “The night was clear and bright. There should have been no difficulty in the airmen recognising it as a hospital.  The hospital is well marked with red crosses, which airmen say are quite visible from the air.  There is no doubt that the occupants of the aeroplane knew it was a hospital, for when the came back and dropped bombs a second time, the flames clearly illuminated the red crosses on the buildings.”
The women nurses, members of the QMAAC and volunteers killed during bombing raids on the night of 29th – 30th May 1918 were buried in the following cemeteries in France:

ABBEVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France

Worker (equivalent to the rank of Private) MARY McLACHLAN BLAIKLEY, 31503. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Mary was killed on 30th May 1918. She was a niece of Robert Blalkley, of Brown's Land, Cartcosh, nr. Glasgow. Grave Reference: IV. C. 4.

Worker BEATRICE V. CAMPBELL, 31673, of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps.  Beatrice was killed on 30th May 1918. Age 20. Daughter of the late John J. and Annie Morgan Campbell, of Cupar, Fife. Grave Reference: IV. C. 6.

Worker MARGARET SELINA CASWELL, 15703 of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps.  Margaret was killed on 30th May 1918 at the age of 22.  Her parents were Fredrick and Mary Jane Caswell, of Green Cross Farm, Churt, Farnham, Surrey. Grave Reference: IV. C. 1.

Worker CATHERINE CONNOR 34767 of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Catherine was killed on 30th May 1918. Grave Reference: IV. C. 9.
Worker JEANIE GRANT, 31918 of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Killed by a bomb from an enemy aeroplane, 30 May 1918. Age 22. Daughter of Mrs. J. Grant, of "Burnfoot," Greengairs, Airdrie, Lanarkshire. Grave Reference: IV. C. 7.

Worker, ANNIE ELIZABETH MOORES, 15695. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Killed in aerial attack on Abbeville, 30th May 1918 at the age of 27. Annie’s parents were Alfred and Mary Moores, of Charlton Lane, Ludwell, Salisbury, Wiltshire, UK. Grave Reference: IV. C. 3.

Worker, ETHEL FRANCIS MARY PARKER, 9048. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Killed by a bomb at Abbeville, 30 May 1918. Age 21. Daughter of William George Parker, of 6, East St., Sturry Rd., Canterbury. Grave Reference: IV. C. 2.

Worker, ALICE THOMASSON, 35588. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 30 May 1918. Grave Reference: IV. C. 8.

WATSON, Worker, JEANIE H. L., 34864. Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. 30 May 1918. Age 25. Daughter of Mrs. J. Oliphant, of 21, Park St., Cambuslang, Glasgow. Grave Reference: IV. C. 5.

BAGNEUX BRITISH CEMETERY, GEZAINCOURT, Somme, France

Nursing Sister, D M Y. BALDWIN, of the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital, Canadian Army Nursing Service. 30 May 1918. Grave Reference: III. A. 24.
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Nursing Sister, A. MacPHERSON, of the Canadian Army Nursing Service. 30 May 1918. Grave Reference: III. A. 26.

Nursing Sister, EDEN LYAL PRINGLE of the Canadian Army Nursing Service. Killed in enemy air raid, 30 May 1918. Age 25. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Pringle, of 2030, 12th Avenue East, Vancouver, British Columbia. Grave Reference: III. A. 25.

ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

STEVENSON, Civilian, BERTHA GAVIN (BETTY).  Betty was a volunteer with the Young Men's Christian Association. She was killed when the aircraft involved in the air raid on Etaples on the night of 30th  May 1918 jettisoned his bombs in a field as he returned to base.,  Betty was 21 years old and had been in France since the beginning of the war.  She was awarded the Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France).  Her parents were Arthur G. and Catherine Grace Stevenson, of Harrogate, Yorks. Betty was born in York.  Grave Reference: XXVIII. M. 6.  Betty is also remembered on Harrogate War Memorial.

30th May 1918

CAMBERWELL OLD CEMETERY, London, UK
Staff Nurse BERTHA VINTNER of the 2nd London General Hospital, a member of the Territorial Force Nursing Service. Bertha died on 30th May 1918. Daughter of Mrs. Vinter, of Wyndham Rd., Camberwell, London, UK. Bertha was buried in Camberwell Old Cemetery - Grave Reference: 101. 25354.

We will remember them

Source:  The Commonwealth War Graves Commission List of Female Casualties of the First World War

Monday, 21 May 2018

Gladys Maude Mary Wake, Nursing Sister with the Canadian Army Nursing Service

Remembering Nursing Sister, GLADYS MAUDE MARY WAKE of the 1st Canadian General Hospital. Gladys was with the Canadian Army Nursing Service. She died of wounds received during an air raid by enemy aircraft on 21st May 1918 at the age of 34.  Gladys’s parents were Gervas Fountayne Wake and Amy Rosamond Wake, of Compton Hill, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK. Gladys was born in Esqlaimault, British Columbia, Canada.  She was buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France , where you will find 19 other women who died or were killed during the First World War.  The Grave Reference for Gladys Maude Mary Wake is  XXVIII. L. 5.

Book Review: “A Lab of One’s Own: Science and Suffrage in the First World War” by Patricia Fara, published by Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2018.

“A Lab of One’s Own: Science and Suffrage in the First World War” by Patricia Fara, published by Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2018.

This is an extremely important book, which, I think, should be required reading for all school pupils because women are still a long way from being treated as equals in our society.  As Fara explains, she wrote the book because, in her view “… the main reason for studying the past is to understand the present – and the whole point of doing that is to improve the future.”

My family has commemorated the First World War for as long as I can remember – Grandfather was an Old Contemptible with the Royal Field Artillery, one Great Uncle was killed at Arras and another died at sea just 3 days before the Armistice.  In spite of that, I did not realise the extent to which women were involved in the conflict until I began researching for a series of commemorative exhibitions in May 2012.  Six years on and Fara’s book has really opened my eyes.  I did not know about most of the women Fara has included and I also learnt a lot of other vital background information. 

As a scientist herself, Fara, who, among other things, lectures on the history of science at Cambridge Unviersity, has a wealth of professional experience which is put to good use in researching this book - the bibliography alone is the most incredible work.

The book is divided into five sections – Preserving the Past, Facing the Future; Abandoning Domesticity, Working for the Vote; Corridors of Science, Crucibles of Power; Scientific Warfare, Wartime Welfare and Citizens of Science in a Post-War World.  Each section has chapters with copious notes which refer you to the bibliography and there are also illustrations throughout.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and it is extremely difficult indeed to pick out just one or two points of particular interst.  However, I particularly enjoyed reading about:  Rachel Costelloe and her fellow cricketers at Newnham College, Cambridge.  Rachel became Mrs Ray Strachey, “one of Britains most prominent suffrage campaigners” (Chapter 1).    Baden-Powell’s wife Olave, who took over the leadership of the Girl Guides during WW1, urging the girls to “prepare sandbags and collect spagnum moss” for dressing wounds. (p. 54).  Nevinson’s “The Acetylene Welder” Lithograph of 1917, which is reproduced on page 85, looks incredibly modern and Mabel Elliott’s outstanding exploits as a member of the British Military Intelligence (p. 183) must have been kept secret for so long due to the Official Secrets Act.

According to Fara, in 1918 King George V said: “When the history of our Countrys share in the war is written, no chapter will be more remarkable than that relating to the range and extent of womens participation…. Some even have fallen under the fire of the enemy.  Of all those we think today with reverent pride.” (p.271).  I wonder what happened because, since then, that participation seems to have been largely forgotten and most people only remember the Tommies and the trenches – I don’t recall any mention of the women who died while serving.  At least the Royal British Legion have amended their WW1 commemortive logo from “Every Man Remembered” to “Everyone Remembered”.

As Fara reminds us, there is no room for complacency in the 21st Century, as women still have a long way to go in the struggle for equality: “Before the First World War, suffragists could see what they were fighting against, but modern discrimination is elusive, insidious and stubbornly hard to eradicate.” (p. 285).

I urge you to read the book for yourselves.  May I suggest it be dedicated to Malala Yousafzai?

Lucy London, May 2018

Thursday, 10 May 2018

Narrelle Hobbes (1878 - 1918) - Australian Nurse, member of the British Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service in WW1

With grateful thanks to Nicki for researching Narrelle for us.  Florence Narrelle Jessie Hobbes was born in Tilba Tilba, New South Wales, Australia on 21st August 1878.  Her parents were J.F. and Margaret Hobbes.

Narrelle began her nursing course in 1903, qualifying in 1910.  She was working in Brewarrina District Hospital when the war began and travelled to England on 20th February 1915 to enlist in the QAIMNS.

Narrelle was initially posted to Malta, then Sicily and then to No. 22 Stationary Hospital, Mesopotamia (now Iraq), in May 1916.  She travelled via India where she worked briefly at Victoria War Hospital before continuing her journey to Basra.  Posted to Amara, Narrelle was based at No. 32 British General Hospital.

Narrelle became ill in June 1917.  After various treatments, she was finally diagnosed with Liver Cancer in February 1918.  Her sister travelled to take Narrelle home but Narrelle died on board the ship taking the sisters back to Australia on 10th May 1918 - the Hospital Ship HMHS "Kanowna".  She was buried at sea and is remembered on the Basra War Memorial in Iraq on Panel 43.

With many thanks to Vicki for her fantastic research.

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/P10679026